Historic Images


Smoke Screen: Campus Pipe Ads

There’s smoke on your computer screen, thanks to this selection of ads from the late ’40s and ’50s, mostly from the Daily Princetonian and Yale Daily News. Leave a comment if this post inspires any of you young men to take up the briar. Chens started at age 21. — CS & CC


The Fall And Rise Of The Ivy League Look

After nearly six months of silence, the blog known as The Ivy League Look — where commentary by the anonymous curator is “kept to a minimum” — came back with a post yesterday with the 1965 ad above for campus clothes from Benoits. Head over there to check out the well organized collection of advertisements,


Here’s To A Tradly Year Ahead

Ages ago in 2014, the blog Oxford Cloth Button Down shared a selection of calendar images by the Japanese artist Hiroshi Watatani, whose most recognized image in Tradsville is probably the one above. We used it here in our post on the Gucci loafer’s 60th anniversary. In case you missed the calendar, here it is.


The Postgraduate

Somehow I don’t think Benjamin Braddock looked like this much longer after the film ends. From a 1962 issue of Esquire. — CC  


What, Me Worry? Yale During The Great Depression

The 1930s was the time of the Great Depression, yet simultaneously it was also the golden age of Hollywood glamor and of masculine elegance. It was also the time when the Ivy League Look flourished, though within closed corridors, the aristocratic golden age versus the postwar, democratic silver age. This article from the Yale Alumni


From The Ashtray Of History: Vintage Campus Cigarette Ads

In my junior year of college my dorm room was decorated in a retro manner. One day a salesman hocking fake Polo and other fragrances popped his head through my open doorway. He took a look at two pictures on the wall and said, trying to break the ice, “Are those your folks?” Slightly annoyed


Ghosts Of Collegians Past: The Fine & Dandy Shop Collection

Last Friday I had the pleasure of sitting next to man-of-the-moment Jack Carlson (author of “Rowing Blazers” and fresh off his packed party at Polo) at the National Arts Club. We were watching slideshow presentations on preppy and Seven Sisters style from Jeffrey Banks and Rebecca Tuite. Meanwhile, unassuming in a corner of the hall,


First To Arrive, Or Last To Leave?

At a party you never want to be the first to arrive nor the last to leave, though someone inevitably must be. Dorm life (which is kind of like an endless party) is no different. This young chap is either an eager beaver at the start of the year, or a sentimental sap waxing contemplative


Important Message: Most Everyone Wears Natural Shoulder

We continue our back-to-school celebrations with another gallery of vintage advertisements from college papers. Most interesting are those from Harvey Ltd. (seen above and below), which catered to the Brown community. “There is a certain style of clothing,” reads the copy in one ad, “which distinguishes the Ivy Leaguer from all other college men.” And


Back To School With Langrock

Starting today Ivy Style celebrates the back-to-school season. We’ll start over the weekend with vintage ads from college papers welcoming freshmen and telling them where to get correct clothes. And next week you’ll get entertaining reads on the heyday from all of us. — CC, CS & RVP


Ivy’s Place On The The Sartorial Totem Pole

Following the mention of Paul Fussell’s pinpoint-accurate and hilarious book “Class” in our last post, faithful reader “Old School” sent us a reminder about another entertaining class theorist, Russell Lynes. The above chart comes from Lynes’ 1949 book “The Tastemakers.” His 1953 Esquire article on the shoe hierarchy at Yale, which we presented several years


Authentic Ivy League Suits Sanitized For Freshness

This ad from a 1959 issue of Sports Illustrated is interesting for a number of reasons. Most obvious is the ad’s premise of dressing young. From our perspective 55 years later, the men in the ad could hardly look more mature. Yet such were the small distinctions of suit-wearing at the time. Then, in the


Batik On Campus

Was batik really worn by college men, or was it a marketing ploy by clothiers, as one reader recently suggested? Evidence courtesy of Lehigh University yearbooks from 1961-65. — CC & CS


Where Main Street Meets The Elite

This ad from mass-market clothier Galey & Lord dates from 1965. But apparently that’s no random model who sat for the portrait. According to textilehistory.org: In the mid-1960s, six prominent socialites had their portraits painted by Henry Koehler. The garments were crafted using G&L fabrics. Ads appeared in the New York Times Feb 2, 1965.


School’s Out: Daily Princetonian Seersucker Ads, 1940s

If you were off on Spring Break or spending the winter in Palm Beach, Princeton’s clothiers of the 1940s had just the clothes you needed, including plenty of seersucker. While not graphically interesting, these ads include interesting copy revealing what was popular with students at the time. — CS & CC