Ivy’s Place On The The Sartorial Totem Pole

Mon 4 Aug 2014 - Filed under: 1920s-'40s,Historic Images — Christian
Comments (4)

lynes

Following the mention of Paul Fussell’s pinpoint-accurate and hilarious book “Class” in our last post, faithful reader “Old School” sent us a reminder about another entertaining class theorist, Russell Lynes. The above chart comes from Lynes’ 1949 book “The Tastemakers.” His 1953 Esquire article on the shoe hierarchy at Yale, which we presented several years ago, is a must-read.

We also featured him back when we were a wee little site of six months old. — CC

Authentic Ivy League Suits Sanitized For Freshness

Sun 3 Aug 2014 - Filed under: 1950s,Historic Images — Christian
Comments (11)

bigu

This ad from a 1959 issue of Sports Illustrated is interesting for a number of reasons. Most obvious is the ad’s premise of dressing young. From our perspective 55 years later, the men in the ad could hardly look more mature. Yet such were the small distinctions of suit-wearing at the time.

Then, in the box on the right, is the apparent trademarking of this “authentic IVY LEAGUE Model.”

And finally there’s the italicized line in the lower left about being “sanitized linings for hygieneic freshness,” with exclamation point.

I recall Paul Fussell’s having a fitting remark about champagne in his book “Class” (DCG, please return my copy.) Something about how the middle class always saves the unused portion by putting aluminum foil over the top, thereby satisfying its dual yet competing desires for luxury (pronounced “lugzhury”) and thrift.

Or, in this case, an authentically prestigious Ivy League model priced “regardless of budget” and sanitized for freshness. — CHRISTIAN CHENSVOLD

 

Batik On Campus

Wed 30 Jul 2014 - Filed under: Historic Images — Christian
Comments (11)

lehigh4

Was batik really worn by college men, or was it a marketing ploy by clothiers, as one reader recently suggested?

Evidence courtesy of Lehigh University yearbooks from 1961-65. — CC & CS (Continue)

 

Buttondowns & Batik: A Campus Shop Ad Gallery

Tue 29 Jul 2014 - Filed under: Historic Images — Christian
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batad1

Some examples of ads from campus newspapers during the Ivy heyday. In the next post, we’ll show you some examples of batik in 2014. — CS & CC (Continue)

 

Going Native: Batik, The Forgotten Campus And Resort Fabric

Sun 27 Jul 2014 - Filed under: 1960s,Clothes,Historic Images — Christian
Comments (29)

batik5

As we reach the heart of summer, I sense a deprivation. It goes virtually unnoticed, and yet it is there for any Ivy enthusiast to investigate. The stores are full of the requisite madras and seersucker, but little else. Compared to the Ivy boom years, or even the golden age of the 1930s, it appears as if part of the color palette is missing, pattern is virtually nonexistent, and ethnically diverse fabrics are nowhere to be found. Some will contend that this is natural selection, that madras and seersucker won fair and square. Others will point out that in a shrinking market, you offer what sells and no longer take risks. A third faction will wish we not peruse the subject at all. But we are going there.

Before the full ascent of the counter culture, back in the days of in loco parentis, there was a burst of sartorial hedonism on campus that students took to with Tahitian abandon. This was expressed in an appreciation for native fabrics. The first fabric family are those that use a dye-resistant technique. This style of cloth dates back at least 1,500 years, and is found in Africa, the Middle East, India and China. For many enthusiasts, the pinnacle of this style is represented in the batiks of Java and the East Indies. Batik takes it entomological roots from the word “ambatik,” which means “to write with little dots.” The word harkens back to the Dutch colonial period, when various forms of the word like mbatek, batik, batek and battik were used. Dutch records from the 17th century report “highly decorated fabrics,” but it wasn’t until the importation of fine quality cloth in the 19th century that allowed the elaborate style to flourish. (Continue)

 
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