1920s-’40s

AA-Tennis

Maytime House Parties: Apparel Arts, 1934

Need some fresh inspiration for your wardrobe? Look no further than Princeton in the 1930s. This passage is from the spring 1934 issue of Apparel Arts, and was alerted to us by Dan Flores of the blog An Uptown Dandy, a fine fellow I’ve met on occasion around town. Assuming the report is accurate (and

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oak street boats

Oak Street’s American-Made Boats, Bits, Mocs And Wings

Oak Street Bootmakers recently introduced a new American-made wingtip to the marketplace. Priced at $486, the substantial double-soled shoe is made of hand-burnished French calf leather and fancy details you can brag to your coworkers about, like a “wheeled welt” and “dovetail toplift.” For those of you who pound the pavement of a big city,

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From The Archives

cbd

New Old School: Introducing Concord Button Downs

Last summer saw the launch of a new US-made shirt company out of Massachusetts called Concord Button Downs. The line began with plaids, but has since focused on oxford cloth in both solids and stripes, including pink. “Our shirts attempt to replicate the OCBDs many men wore in the ’50s and ’60s,” says founder Daniel

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princeton1942

Glad-Time Night In Tigertown, 1942

What to wear with a rep tie and OCBD? How about a plaid tweed jacket and a windowpane vest? There were so many options during the Golden Age Of Ivy, even while there was a war going on. Cheers to Chris Sharp for spotting this 1942 illustration from the Esquire archives, which you can access


esky46.2

Heavy Program, 1946

An encore from Esquire in the year 1946 (head over here to access the archives for a mere $4.99 per month). According to the text, the student on the left has a tweed suit cut in “conventional three-button style and easy lines.” The other fellow “sticks to the regulation two-tone saddle-strap shoes, checked tweed jacket


esky 1946

Tweeds On The Books, 1946

The war was over and the boys were already back in school. This is from the Esquire archives, which recently went online and can be accessed for a mere $4.99 per month. Ivy Style Facebook member and comment leaver “Carmelo” found this image from 1946, which features some of my favorite things: blue buttondown, grey



weejun

Ideal For Lounging About: Bass Weejuns, 1936

It’s already time to dip into the Esquire archives again. This one was spotted by Marc Chevalier, walking menswear encyclopedia and member of Ivy Style’s Facebook group. The ad above dates to August 1936, less than one year after Esquire had helped introduce the Bass Weejun to the nation. Two months later, there was this


ernestjones

What Is The Origin Of The Two-Button Cuff?

The Masters golf tournament gets underway tomorrow, and so in the interest of timeliness we present the above photo to fuel historic conjecture. The photo is of Ernest Jones, one of the most famous early golf instructors and author of the classic tome “Swing The Clubhead.” Jones was an Englishman who lost a leg in


bbnewyorker

Brooks Civvies: The New Yorker, 1945

Perhaps the heyday of the Ivy League Look began not in the ’50s, but the moment after World War II’s detente. In this 1945 New Yorker cartoon, a soldier returns home from the war and is told by his mother to immediately get himself some mufti at Brooks Brothers to show that everything is all


white

White Friday

  Stuff your stocking with stocking ties from White of New Haven.



yale30s

What, Me Worry? Yale During The Great Depression

The 1930s was the time of the Great Depression, yet simultaneously it was also the golden age of Hollywood glamor and of masculine elegance. It was also the time when the Ivy League Look flourished, though within closed corridors, the aristocratic golden age versus the postwar, democratic silver age. This article from the Yale Alumni



lynes

Ivy’s Place On The The Sartorial Totem Pole

Following the mention of Paul Fussell’s pinpoint-accurate and hilarious book “Class” in our last post, faithful reader “Old School” sent us a reminder about another entertaining class theorist, Russell Lynes. The above chart comes from Lynes’ 1949 book “The Tastemakers.” His 1953 Esquire article on the shoe hierarchy at Yale, which we presented several years