A Very Good Year: Hillflint’s Ivy League Class Sweaters

Tue 17 Dec 2013 - Filed under: Ivy Trendwatch — Christian
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hillflint

Ed Heald (Dartmouth ’68) may have had to sweat through soccer tryouts to earn the famous sweater that bore the date of his graduation and appears twice in the pages of “Take Ivy,” but now, thanks to a team of entrepreneurial young Ivy Leaguers, a vintage-inspired collegiate sweater can be had with only the exertion required of e-commerce.

Founded by John Shi in 2012 after his graduation from Dartmouth, Hillflint produces sweaters in extra-fine merino wool bearing the colors and letters of Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, Yale and Cornell.

According to Shi, his company began with the intention of “bringing back an old collegiate tradition from the ‘Take Ivy’ era” and Hillflint started small, owing its growth to word-of-mouth among students and faculty on Ivy League campuses.

1968 guy

Rather than simply reproducing the coarse texture of vintage knitwear, Shi says he set out to improve upon the original collegiate sweaters by creating a garment that is “super soft, as well as be able to last for generations.”
Owing to their athletic heritage, Hillflint sweaters have a raglan sleeve, crew neck, and trim fit. Future graduates can purchase sweaters with their class year through Hillflint’s website, and alumni can contact the company directly for custom orders.

For Ivy League grads not looking to date themselves, Hillflint has an upcoming line of Heritage Sweaters, with the institution’s letter replacing the class year, vailable for pre-order.

hitsman

In addition to their Ivy League sweaters, Hillflint also offers a line of school ties through a collaboration with upstart neckwear brand Hitsman. Made in New York from English repp silk, the narrow ties come in both a traditional stripe and an understated dot pattern that, while tasteful, might be too subtle to get one photographed in the cafeteria line by a visiting team of Japanese photographers. — ZACHARY DELUCA

Pipes & Sacks Get The Chicks, Arthur Miller Version

Sun 7 Jul 2013 - Filed under: Ivy Trendwatch,Personae — Christian
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miller

Back in Ivy Style’s freshman year we did a post on Hugh Hefner’s Ivy phase called “Pipes And Cardigans Get The Chicks.”

Well Hef may have gotten Marilyn Monroe as the first Playboy Playmate, but Arthur Miller got her for a wife.

About a week ago Esquire’s website paid a little style tribute to Miller with a simultaneous lionizing of the sack jacket:

In this photo, taken in 1956 at the couple’s estate in Englefield Green, England, Miller is a paragon of East Coast style. A born-and-raised New Yorker, the playwright’s trad roots clearly run deep, from his dark-rimmed specs to his dotted silk tie to his oxford cloth button-down (with a pretty perfect collar roll, we might add.) But it’s that little buttonhole — right above his thumb; see it? — that holds the key to Miller’s superior style.

Basically a reworked three-button setup where the top button and buttonhole serve only as ornament so it fastens like a two-button, the three-roll-two is one of the most quintessentially American button stances. Closely associated with the “Ivy League” look that reigned during Miller’s mid-century career, it’s an enduring (and increasingly international) style to this day. Put simply: It’s a classic.

Esquire goes on to muse whether the sack jacket helped catch Marilyn’s eye. There was no mention of the pipe, alas. — c C m

 

Help A Prep With His Homework

Mon 17 Jun 2013 - Filed under: Historic Texts,Ivy Trendwatch — Christian
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gc

Over the past few years, the Ivy Trendwatch has helped bring scholarly attention to the clothing and social customs of college men during the heyday of the Ivy League Look. “Take Ivy” shined an outsider’s lens on college life in the mid-’60s with a specific eye for what men were wearing. Then came the MFIT exhibit, and previous contributors Rebecca C. Tuite and Deirdre Clemente both have books coming out on postwar college life and style. Meanwhile, Richard Press is also cranking out his memoirs.

All this has helped bring us to the point today where a kid can say he wants to do an independent study course on the history of prep-school fashion and the teachers actually go for it.

Pictured above is George Cleveland, a student at The Hill School, a private institution founded in 1851 in Pottstown, Pennsylvania. He’s an Ivy Style reader who seeks to connect with guys who prepped in previous decades in order to gather their sartorial recollections for his research paper. (Continue)

 

Bits At Burdine’s: The Squire Shop, 1968

Wed 12 Dec 2012 - Filed under: Clothes,Historic Texts,Ivy Trendwatch,Lit — Christian
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A couple of weeks ago we posted a collection of vintage Dexter advertisements, and here’s an interesting follow up. In 1968, as the Ivy League Look was plummeting in popularity, the shoe that would cement itself as a preppy staple in the 1970s was gradually garnering greater attention.

The above ad is from The Palm Beach Post and plugs the Squire Shop, the in-store campus shop of Florida department store chain Burdine’s. Here Dexter bit loafers are paired with Gant buttondowns and a Hunter Haig three-piece sack suit in the ’60s Ivy palette of gray and olive.

Bit loafers may be a common sight today in Palm Beach; three-piece sack suits not so much. — CC

 

Ivy Trendwatch: Bikes And Bow Ties Edition

Sun 21 Oct 2012 - Filed under: Ivy Trendwatch — Christian
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Fifty years ago, in the midst of the Ivy heyday, mass-market retailers started offering knock-offs of items previously available from only a handful of menswear shops. Often these brands referenced the Ivy League Look in their ad copy, throwing in, for such the nature of advertising, words like “genuine” and “authentic.”

Now it looks like our own Ivy Trendwatch is producing a new round of what Richard Press calls “Main Street Ivy.” On Friday the e-commerce company Indochino sent out a mailer promoting Ivy League style.

As you can see, “Ivy League” apparently consists not of specifically styled clothing items, but of a formula that can be achieved with simple ingredients, such as bow ties, cardigans, bicycles and side-parted hair.— CC

 
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