1960s

Ivy Trendwatch: WWD On Upcoming Preppy Book

Last week Women’s Wear Daily ran a feature on the upcoming book “Preppy: Cultivating Ivy Style,” by Jeffrey Banks and Doria de La Chapelle. Among other things, the story includes the great photo above of Deerfield Academy’s class of 1961. The story’s author, David Lipke, goes on to note preppy style’s relative imperviousness to change


JFK Buttoned Down

Today is Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis’ birthday (she would have been 82), and obliquely in her honor we present a photo of her late husband captured wearing a buttondown collar, which he eschewed upon entering the national spotlight, saying they were “too Ivy League.” — CC


Romance at Eastern Kentucky University, 1963

The French preppy blog Greensleeves To A Ground dug up a series of photos depicting couples at Eastern Kentucky University from 1963-1964. Plenty of chinos, penny loafers, collegiate haircuts, and third button on the back of shirt collars. Not to mention young couples gazing longingly into each other’s eyes at the most feverish “should we


Bicycle Week: Take a Ride with Take Ivy

As I suggested in the rececent olive post, now that we’ve all drunk in the big picture, the atmosphere, of “Take Ivy,” I think the reason to return to it will be in order to look specifically at certain things like shoes, haircuts, trousers, and, in this case, bicycles. The three “Take Ivy” authors felt


Bicycle Week: A Velocipede Miscellany

Yeah that headline is a bit florid. But hey, this ain’t Junior-College-Style.com. Bike Week continues (not concludes) with a random assortment of images. First, the Gant bicycle, which was released about a year ago with a price tag of $995. Only 25 were made available in the US, and as of a month ago there


Take Olive: Drab Dress on the College Campus

Now that the style world has been able to pore over “Take Ivy” without having to pay $1,500 to do so, I think the lasting legacy of the book will be isolating certain motifs. It’s like rewatching a movie: First you take in the whole, and then in subsequent viewings you focus on more subtle



Jazz vs. Ivy: All The Fine Young Cannibals, 1960

Jazz and Ivy duel for the affections of Natalie Wood in “All the Fine Young Cannibals,” a largely forgotten melodrama released a half a century ago. The film has not been released on DVD, but there are used VHS copies floating about, and if you search the web you might find a digital version. “All


Lost Treasure: O’Connell’s Uncovers ’60s-Era Tweed Stash

O’Connell’s is a big place. How big? Big enough for 26 tweed sportcoats to get lost for decades. Owner Ethan Huber recently discovered a stash of two dozen tweed sportcoats made shortly after the store opened in 1959. The jackets have all the Ivy details straight from the heyday: natural shoulders, three-button fronts, narrow lapels,


The Man Who Brought Ivy To Japan

In celebration of powerHouse Books’ publication of “Take Ivy” on August 31, Ivy-Style examines the life and career of Kensuke Ishizu, founder of Japanese clothing company VAN JACKET and the man who commissioned “Take Ivy.” The article is by W. David Marx, who previously wrote on the Japanese youth cult the Miyuki-zoku. Marx himself has


Princeton Newsreel, 1961

Our latest video from the Princeton Campus Life channel on YouTube is just the thing to get you in the mood for the release of “Take Ivy” next week. It’s another long one, but worth watching in full. Students in jackets and ties make their first appearance at 4:26, and return repeatedly, so be patient


Southern Comfort: Shag The Movie, 1989

“Take Ivy” is full of students wearing shorts, untucked oxfords and Weejuns without socks. This begs the question: Did the look originate on Yankee campuses, or did the practice originate in the South, with Southern students taking the look North with them when they headed off to college? Made in 1989 and set in Myrtle


Take Ivy: Last Gasp of the Ivy League Look

When powerHouse Books releases the first English-language edition of “Take Ivy” on August 31, eager readers will finally get a chance to see its enchantingly atmospheric photos as they were meant to be seen: within the hardbound covers of a picture book. Though widely disseminated on the Internet, scanned photos seen on a computer screen


Bleach Bum: Adler’s Clean White Socks

Back in the heyday there was only one white sock for the college man to wear with his Weejuns: wool ones by Adler. Though the ad above testifies to Adler’s pristine whiteness, it was actually much cooler to bleach them a sickly yellow color. I stumbled across the above image (which you can find on


Mission Accomplished: Robert Culp, 1930-2010

Last week saw the passing of actor Robert Culp, who starred in the ’60s TV show “I Spy.” Last year Ivy-Style contributor Zachary DeLuca wrote a fine tribute to the show, in which Culp plays a former tennis star turned secret agent generously costumed in natural-shouldered suits and buttondown collars. The post can be found


Chipp of New York: Ivy League Athletics Supporters

When legendary clothing company Chipp moved in 1985, Paul Winston threw away the pattern he had once used to make suits for President Kennedy. He still kicks himself for it, but at least he managed to save the vintage Cornell jock strap pictured above. Winston recently shared the item, sized medium, while I visited his


Cyrus in Cyprus, Junior the DA

Yesterday The New York Times ran a profile on Manhattan District Attorney elect Cyrus Vance, Jr. that makes a passing reference to Brooks Brothers and Chipp. In Ivy-Style’s interview with Chipp’s Paul Winston, Vance Senior, who served as Secretary of State in the Carter administration, was mentioned as a frequent customer. Though Winston recalls making


The Miyuki-zoku: Japan’s First Ivy Rebels

The first Japanese to adopt elements of the Ivy League Look were a youth tribe called the Miyuki-zoku, who suddenly appeared in the summer of 1964. The group’s name came from their storefront loitering on Miyuki Street in the upscale Ginza shopping neighborhood (the suffix “zoku” means subculture or social group). The Miyuki-zoku were mostly


The Game

The annual Harvard-Yale football game — known to students and alumni simply as The Game — has been played since 1875 and alternates each year between Harvard Stadium and the Yale Bowl. The Game is famous for its always-waning-but-never-quite-dead tradition of genteel tailgating, nowadays conducted alongside college parties more squarely within the “Animal House” tradition.


Outgoing and Determined: Remembering Tim Thompson

When Timothy Thompson, an 18-year-old from Ashland, Oregon, was chosen by LIFE Magazine to have his first semester at Yale chronicled, a massive challenge lay before him. Not only did he have to adapt to the school academically and socially, he had to do so while a reporter and photographer followed him around campus, capturing



Ashe Wednesday

On Monday a young Argentine named Juan Martin del Potro won his first major title, beating Roger Federer to win the US Open. We’d like to honor, however, Arthur Ashe, who won the inaugural US Open in 1968. He’s pictured above in 1966; the accompanying story is here.


The Cool and the Beautiful

In the arts and culture, generally things are either cool or beautiful. Marcello Mastroianni in “La Dolce Vita” is cool, while beauty is what happens between 1:18 and 2:59 in the third movement of Brahms’ Piano Trio in C Minor. “Cool” didn’t exist before midcentury, while since then the quaint notion that art should be


Lemmon-tations of a Company Man

Our Jack Lemmon series concludes with a look at 1964’s “Good Neighbor Sam,” in which Lemmon plays a wholesome family man who works in San Francisco at — what else? — an advertising agency. He commutes over the Golden Gate Bridge from Marin County, which I too did for a while. Did you know the


Cocktails For Two

Our Jack Lemmon movie marathon commences with a retraction. When I did a post on the 50th anniversary of “Breakfast at Tiffany’s,” I wrote that director Blake Edwards never again reached such heights. That may be true, but he certainly reached greater depths. I’d always avoided “Days of Wine and Roses,” as I just never


When LIFE Gives You Lemmons

This is the first in a series of posts on actor Jack Lemmon, which will include movie recommendations and sartorial screen shots. But we’ll start things off with a few photos from the LIFE Magazine archives.


Somewhere in Time: Socks are for Suckas

With this post Ivy-Style revisits our Somewhere in Time series, based on articles from the Time Magazine archives. Custom dictates that the bottom button on a vest or cardigan is left nonchalantly undone, a tradition credited to the absent-mindedness of Edward VII. The origins of socks without loafers are probably similar: Some stylish student somewhere


Pipes and Cardigans Get the Chicks

Playboy in its early years has always struck me as the ultimate men’s magazine. The emphasis on jazz and literature gave it a highbrow edge not found in today’s magazines, in which articles on socially relevant topics, rather than aesthetic matters, provide the weight and seriousness. Moreover, Playboy‘s editorial vision really did encapsulate a lifestyle,


Lost City: John Lindsay’s New York

John Vliet Lindsay, mayor of New York from 1966 to 1973, personified the resolute confusion with which clubby, liberal WASPs faced the social upheaval of the era. Entering politics as a successful young lawyer, Lindsay represented the wealthy Upper East Side of Manhattan, known as the Silk Stocking District, in Congress from 1958 to 1965.