Lemmon-tations of a Company Man

Our Jack Lemmon series concludes with a look at 1964’s “Good Neighbor Sam,” in which Lemmon plays a wholesome family man who works in San Francisco at — what else? — an advertising agency. He commutes over the Golden Gate Bridge from Marin County, which I too did for a while. Did you know the


Bow Ties and Bongos

Our Jack Lemmon tribute continues with a look at two films in which he plays supporting roles. In 1958’s “Bell, Book and Candle,” Lemmon stars as a warlock who plays bongos with a suit-clad jazz combo in a Greenwich Village beatnik club. Kim Novak is the female lead in one of the sexiest roles ever


Cocktails For Two

Our Jack Lemmon movie marathon commences with a retraction. When I did a post on the 50th anniversary of “Breakfast at Tiffany’s,” I wrote that director Blake Edwards never again reached such heights. That may be true, but he certainly reached greater depths. I’d always avoided “Days of Wine and Roses,” as I just never


When LIFE Gives You Lemmons

This is the first in a series of posts on actor Jack Lemmon, which will include movie recommendations and sartorial screen shots. But we’ll start things off with a few photos from the LIFE Magazine archives.


Somewhere in Time: Socks are for Suckas

With this post Ivy-Style revisits our Somewhere in Time series, based on articles from the Time Magazine archives. Custom dictates that the bottom button on a vest or cardigan is left nonchalantly undone, a tradition credited to the absent-mindedness of Edward VII. The origins of socks without loafers are probably similar: Some stylish student somewhere


Warlord of the Weejuns

In 1965, Esquire jazz and style writer George Frazier wrote this essay for the liner notes of the album “Miles Davis’ Greatest Hits.” The Warlord of the Weejuns By George Frazier I don’t mean to be a bastard about this, but, at the same time, I have no intention of being agreeable just for the

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Pipes and Cardigans Get the Chicks

Playboy in its early years has always struck me as the ultimate men’s magazine. The emphasis on jazz and literature gave it a highbrow edge not found in today’s magazines, in which articles on socially relevant topics, rather than aesthetic matters, provide the weight and seriousness. Moreover, Playboy‘s editorial vision really did encapsulate a lifestyle,


Lost City: John Lindsay’s New York

John Vliet Lindsay, mayor of New York from 1966 to 1973, personified the resolute confusion with which clubby, liberal WASPs faced the social upheaval of the era. Entering politics as a successful young lawyer, Lindsay represented the wealthy Upper East Side of Manhattan, known as the Silk Stocking District, in Congress from 1958 to 1965.


Go Daddy-O: Happy Father’s Day from Ivy-Style

This Father’s Day, why not do something really classic and take your cue from the TV show “My Three Sons”? Simply put on your finest suits and share an exciting father-son bicycle ride. It’s certainly more original than playing catch in the backyard. Airing from 1960-1972, “My Three Sons” centered around a single father raising


Drones Club: IBM’s New HQ in ’62

As a follow-up to our recent post on IBM president and Chipp customer Thomas J. Watson, Jr., Ivy-Style presents the following photo spread. In “IBM Story,” Life Magazine chronicled the company’s new headquarters in Dayton, NJ, which IBM moved into in the fall of 1962. (Click images for hi-res version.)

Performance Anxiety

As we’ve repeatedly been told, WASP nonchalance is merely an affectation, a performance that renders its mannered marionettes ever anxious about committing some cred-crushing gaucherie. And if it’s like that for members of the tribe, just imagine what it’s like for Jews. Tobias Wolff’s 2003 novel “Old School” belongs to the prep-school-coming-of-age genre, while its


Chipp Off The Old Block

Paul Winston’s bold suit linings are so famous, many clients select the fabric for the lining before the fabric for the suit itself. Vivid linings are just one of the signature styles of Winston, the renowned tailor who began working for his father Sidney’s New York-based clothing company Chipp in 1961. Chipp soon became renowned



Mid-century TV shows such as Dragnet, Bewitched and My Three Sons are rich in sartorial eye candy. But rarely does a show provide the perfect combination of great writing, great acting, and great tailoring. Get Smart is often lauded in this regard, but it is really little more than slapstick. Those seeking a more serious program for


March Tradness

In honor of March Madness, which begins today, Ivy-Style pays tribute to Bill Bradley, the 1965 National Player of the Year for Princeton. At the time, the school had produced more American presidents than basketball All-Americans. Bradley made the cover of the December 7th, 1964 issue of Sports Illustrated, complete with classic Princeton haircut. (Shot


New Haven Commuters, 1961

Since prep school they told you the right schools, connections and career would bring the keys to the kingdom. They neglected to mention, however, that the kingdom is in New Haven, Connecticut — 80 miles from Midtown Manhattan. Neglecting the lost art of conversation: If you weren’t a smoker, you are now:


Bruce Almighty

Over the past several decades, G. Bruce Boyer has distinguished himself as one of the most erudite writers ever to tackle the subject of menswear. Born in 1941, he came of age at the Ivy League Look’s height in popularity. A graduate of Moravian, the fifth-oldest college in the US, Boyer went on to do

Eastern Elite

Kyu Sakamoto‘s “Ue o muite arukō” is one of the best pop songs to come out of the ’60s. It topped the Billboard charts in 1963, the only Japanese song ever to do so. Since the song’s title didn’t lend itself to easy export, the song was marketed worldwide under the name “Sukiyaki,” a dish


Blue Man Group

Before 1894, when Yale adopted its special shade of blue (hex triplet #0F4D92), its school color was green. Kind of like the freshmen pictured above at a welcoming ceremony, 1964. Now that they’re bulldogs, it’s time to start looking the part. First, a college sweater (1959): Then a proper jacket. Freshman getting a sermon on


Jersey Boys

Princeton University dance, 1960. (Click images to see the haircuts and shoulders in hi-res.) The school didn’t admit women until ’69 — except on nights like this. Check out Crewneck Sweater Guy in the background, a veritable Ivy style poster boy:


Writers Block

In 1962 Life ran a group of photos of American authors. Pictured above is James Baldwin, while below is Philip Roth. Click on images for hi-res version:


Ten Thousand Men Of Harvard

OK, maybe not ten thousand (as in the school’s fight song), but here are a few. The handsome gent above and below is Aga Khan (no date for photo; Khan graduated in ’59), whose step-mother was Rita Hayworth: Students and professor, 1952:


Poison Ivy League

See these Ivy frat boys? Elvis uses his fists to wipe the smug looks off their faces. After seeming to romanticize fraternity life in our last post, we thought we’d balance the scales by romanticizing fraternity jerks who get punched out by a greaser from the wrong side of the tracks. Such a greaser is