1960s

Dateline 1967: G. Bruce Boyer On The Great Break With The Past

Part of our yearlong series commemorating the 50th anniversary of the  year 1967, which brought an end to the heyday of the Ivy League Look. * * * I was still in grad school and a teaching assistant in 1967. In grad school we were reading “Beowulf” and Chaucer, Alexander Pope and John Donne. As


Valentine’s Day Special: Ken & Barbie, The Ivy Years

For devotees of The Ivy League Look who live in 2017 but who aspire to buy clothes in 1957, there are two pieces of technology that can help. While the best option is a time machine, it is unfortunate that they are still notoriously unreliable, as any number of movies illustrate. The second option is


Dateline 1967: Dustin Hoffman In The Graduate

Welcome to the first post kicking off Ivy Style’s yearlong celebration of the 50th anniversary of the year 1967, which brought about the fall of the heyday of the Ivy League Look. Pictured is Dustin Hoffman in what is presumably a publicity shot for “The Graduate.” Released in 1967 near Christmas and partially set at


Sunday Best: Super Bowl Crowd, 1967

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the year 1967, the year we’ve come to refer to around here as the end of the heyday of the Ivy League Look. We plan to make it a theme throughout 2017 as we gather photographs and anecdotes about this pivotal transition year in American social history. It’s


Remembering Dick Van Dyke And Mary Tyler Moore

Over the years I’ve thought about doing a post on Dick Van Dyke, as his television show was immensely popular during the heyday of the Ivy League Look. In many ways he is the pop culture personification of the Atomic Age man in gray suits, white shirts and black ties working in a field like



The Great Indoors

Midcentury modern fans, as well as guys who are single (or sometimes wish they were), will likely enjoy heading over to our fraternal site Masculine Interiors for a fine article posted yesterday. It’s about Playboy’s architectural and interior design articles of the ’50s and ’60s, and was written by contributor James Kraus. Kraus’ previous articles


Great Escape: The Automotive Illustration Of Fitzpatrick & Kaufman

James Kraus, who has authored a piece for Ivy Style on bachelor cuisine, has alerted us to a post from his vintage automotive blog, Auto Universum. The piece centers around Art Fitzpatrick and Van Kaufman, the Matisse and Picasso of automotive illustration. Writes Kraus: These lush images depicted scenes of glamour and sophistication populated by


Art of the Deal: 1960s Japanese Playing Cards

Well here’s a super-cool discovery: a pack of 1960s playing cards using cover art for the magazine Heibon Punch, by artist Ayumi Ohashi. The cards, our translator tells us, depict a wide range of social situations and leisure activities and the proper attire for each. — CC


What A Catch: Vassar Versus Ivies Touch Football

“Vassar College’s touch football team today issued a challenge to the Kennedy family in Washington: play us,” announced The Poughkeepsie Journal in November 1962. The reason for such sporting confidence? In the fall of that year, Vassar students had formed the first all-female college touch football teams. With names like the Joss Jocks, Noyes Nymphs


Velvet Touch: RFK + Slippers

Our last post featured JFK in velvet slippers on Christmas. Today we have his brother Bobby going slipshot on Halloween. Both seemed to like tossing them on around the house while dressed relatively casually, as opposed to taking the shoe super-serious and donning it with black tie, ascot, or smoking jacket. I still don’t have


Yellow Pants, Athletic Socks, Velvet Slippers: JFK’s Christmas Outfit, 1962

It’s not too late to change your clothes and pull a JFK for the rest of Christmas Day. These wonderful candids were posted this morning to Ivy Style’s Facebook group and feature JFK celebrating his final Christmas in Palm Beach in 1962. He is dressed in white shirt, necktie, yellow trousers, white athletic socks, and


The Only Way To Wear A Button-Down With Style, 1966

The San Francisco Chronicle recently chose a very intersting piece to run from its archives. The paper chose a 50-year-old piece brimming with anecdotes about the buttondown collar. It opens like this: The late Jack Kennedy looked up from his desk in the White House on a day in 1963. One of his aides had


Jacket And Tie No Problem: Washington & Lee, 1969

In our last post, we saw that Harvard in 1969 was already a sea of denim. But what did a small liberal arts school like Washington & Lee look like? It looked like this. Thanks to frequent comment-leaver “SE” for submitting these. — CC


The Non-Iron Oxford 50 Years Ago

For your consideration, a 1966 advertisement for non-iron oxford-cloth buttondowns, presented non-ironically. Convenient for impromtu games of touch football and expanding waistlines due to heavy meals. Happy Thanksgiving fom Ivy Style. Tomorrow our club tie goes on sale! — CC


Picture Show: Hollywood And The Ivy Look

Our last post was on Warren Beatty’s being named one of GQ’s men of the year for 2016. A perfect excuse to revisit this 2012 post on the book “Hollywood And The Ivy Look,” which includes Beatty, along with many other leading men and character actors who launched their careers during the heyday of the


Jack and John: The Sartorial Dichotomy of JFK

Was John F. Kennedy the most Ivy of US presidents, or did the most important man in the country actually encourage American men not to follow the Ivy League Look? That depends on whether you’re talking about President Kennedy the nation’s leader, or Jack Kennedy relaxing among friends and family in Hyannis Port. On assignment


Think For Yourself And Question Authority

While poking around the web doing some Ivy Style research, I came across this photo from the days of the Ivy twilight. Pictured above at right is Timothy Leary — just a name to an Xer like myself and perhaps wholly foreign to Millennial readers. But Leary — who was a Harvard professor and advocate


Back To School Memories: Gant Shirts And An Air Force Parka

Previous contributor James Kraus herein shares some back-to-school memories from the late ’60s. If you came of age in the Ivy heyday or preppy ’80s and have sartorial and scholastic memories you’d like to share, please send them over using the contact button above. * * * The earliest memory I have of any particular


Wild Weekend

Have a wild holiday weekend — in wild shirts by Gant. These ads ran in The New Yorker (hardly a periodical aimed at trendy kids) in 1966 and 1967. The models are surprisingly mature. You’re only as old as you dress! — CC & CS


Light in the Loafers

Here at Ivy Style HQ, I’ve lately taken to wearing socks lighter in shade than my trousers, such as a light-gray sock paired with charcoal pants and black tassel loafers. There’s something about light socks that puts a spring in your step. As you move, you catch the light color from the corner of your


What Would Don Do?

Our recent post on the new business casual dress code at JP Morgan and PricewaterhouseCoopers inspired this quip in the comments section: So glad Weiner ended ‘Mad Men’ so I never will have to watch a 60-year-old Don Draper wear a size large OCBD with Top-Siders and chinos to the office. Which got me wondering:


Blistering Combination

This post originally ran a year ago and is being reposted in light of the passing of an American legend. * * * You probably heard there was a fight last night. I don’t understand the $100 million payouts, so don’t even try to explain them to me. Pictured above is Muhammad Ali in the


Tales From The Twilight: A Yankee Gets A Southern Education In Style

This is the latest in our series of reader anecdotes about the ’60s. If you’d like to participate, please use the contact button above. * * * I graduated from an affluent suburban high school in the mid-Atlantic region in 1963. Although my father owned a men’s clothing store, I was not terribly interested in



John Lewton, Heyday-Era Campus Shop Serving Cornell

Roger Sack, Cornell class of 1962, was a young man who knew clothes. He inherited a sense of style from his father, who, though the son of poor immigrants, shopped at Rogers Peet, Brooks Brothers and Paul Stuart. He was a man of “refined taste,” remembers Sack, whose souvenir from World War II was a