1960s

Art of the Deal: 1960s Japanese Playing Cards

Well here’s a super-cool discovery: a pack of 1960s playing cards using cover art for the magazine Heibon Punch, by artist Ayumi Ohashi. The cards, our translator tells us, depict a wide range of social situations and leisure activities and the proper attire for each. — CC


What A Catch: Vassar Versus Ivies Touch Football

“Vassar College’s touch football team today issued a challenge to the Kennedy family in Washington: play us,” announced The Poughkeepsie Journal in November 1962. The reason for such sporting confidence? In the fall of that year, Vassar students had formed the first all-female college touch football teams. With names like the Joss Jocks, Noyes Nymphs


Velvet Touch: RFK + Slippers

Our last post featured JFK in velvet slippers on Christmas. Today we have his brother Bobby going slipshot on Halloween. Both seemed to like tossing them on around the house while dressed relatively casually, as opposed to taking the shoe super-serious and donning it with black tie, ascot, or smoking jacket. I still don’t have


Yellow Pants, Athletic Socks, Velvet Slippers: JFK’s Christmas Outfit, 1962

It’s not too late to change your clothes and pull a JFK for the rest of Christmas Day. These wonderful candids were posted this morning to Ivy Style’s Facebook group and feature JFK celebrating his final Christmas in Palm Beach in 1962. He is dressed in white shirt, necktie, yellow trousers, white athletic socks, and


The Only Way To Wear A Button-Down With Style, 1966

The San Francisco Chronicle recently chose a very intersting piece to run from its archives. The paper chose a 50-year-old piece brimming with anecdotes about the buttondown collar. It opens like this: The late Jack Kennedy looked up from his desk in the White House on a day in 1963. One of his aides had


Jacket And Tie No Problem: Washington & Lee, 1969

In our last post, we saw that Harvard in 1969 was already a sea of denim. But what did a small liberal arts school like Washington & Lee look like? It looked like this. Thanks to frequent comment-leaver “SE” for submitting these. — CC


The Non-Iron Oxford 50 Years Ago

For your consideration, a 1966 advertisement for non-iron oxford-cloth buttondowns, presented non-ironically. Convenient for impromtu games of touch football and expanding waistlines due to heavy meals. Happy Thanksgiving fom Ivy Style. Tomorrow our club tie goes on sale! — CC


Picture Show: Hollywood And The Ivy Look

Our last post was on Warren Beatty’s being named one of GQ’s men of the year for 2016. A perfect excuse to revisit this 2012 post on the book “Hollywood And The Ivy Look,” which includes Beatty, along with many other leading men and character actors who launched their careers during the heyday of the


Jack and John: The Sartorial Dichotomy of JFK

Was John F. Kennedy the most Ivy of US presidents, or did the most important man in the country actually encourage American men not to follow the Ivy League Look? That depends on whether you’re talking about President Kennedy the nation’s leader, or Jack Kennedy relaxing among friends and family in Hyannis Port. On assignment


Think For Yourself And Question Authority

While poking around the web doing some Ivy Style research, I came across this photo from the days of the Ivy twilight. Pictured above at right is Timothy Leary — just a name to an Xer like myself and perhaps wholly foreign to Millennial readers. But Leary — who was a Harvard professor and advocate


Back To School Memories: Gant Shirts And An Air Force Parka

Previous contributor James Kraus herein shares some back-to-school memories from the late ’60s. If you came of age in the Ivy heyday or preppy ’80s and have sartorial and scholastic memories you’d like to share, please send them over using the contact button above. * * * The earliest memory I have of any particular


Wild Weekend

Have a wild holiday weekend — in wild shirts by Gant. These ads ran in The New Yorker (hardly a periodical aimed at trendy kids) in 1966 and 1967. The models are surprisingly mature. You’re only as old as you dress! — CC & CS


Light in the Loafers

Here at Ivy Style HQ, I’ve lately taken to wearing socks lighter in shade than my trousers, such as a light-gray sock paired with charcoal pants and black tassel loafers. There’s something about light socks that puts a spring in your step. As you move, you catch the light color from the corner of your


What Would Don Do?

Our recent post on the new business casual dress code at JP Morgan and PricewaterhouseCoopers inspired this quip in the comments section: So glad Weiner ended ‘Mad Men’ so I never will have to watch a 60-year-old Don Draper wear a size large OCBD with Top-Siders and chinos to the office. Which got me wondering:


Blistering Combination

This post originally ran a year ago and is being reposted in light of the passing of an American legend. * * * You probably heard there was a fight last night. I don’t understand the $100 million payouts, so don’t even try to explain them to me. Pictured above is Muhammad Ali in the


Tales From The Twilight: A Yankee Gets A Southern Education In Style

This is the latest in our series of reader anecdotes about the ’60s. If you’d like to participate, please use the contact button above. * * * I graduated from an affluent suburban high school in the mid-Atlantic region in 1963. Although my father owned a men’s clothing store, I was not terribly interested in



John Lewton, Heyday-Era Campus Shop Serving Cornell

Roger Sack, Cornell class of 1962, was a young man who knew clothes. He inherited a sense of style from his father, who, though the son of poor immigrants, shopped at Rogers Peet, Brooks Brothers and Paul Stuart. He was a man of “refined taste,” remembers Sack, whose souvenir from World War II was a


Ten Thousand Men Of Harvard

OK, maybe not ten thousand (as in the school’s fight song), but here are a few. The handsome gent above and below is Aga Khan (no date for photo; Khan graduated in ’59), whose step-mother was Rita Hayworth: Students and professor, 1952: Book fair, 1957: Commencement, 1961: Alumni Day, 1968: This one is captioned “Harvard


Tales From The Twilight: A Preppy Frat In A Time Of Sartorial Anarchy

This is the second installment in our new Tales From The Twilight series, about the final days of the Ivy heyday in the late ’60s. If you were a firsthand witness and would like to share your personal observations, please use the contact button above. * * * Your article about “sartorial anarchy” reminded me


Tales From The Twilight: Request For Reader Submissions

The past couple of days discussion in the comments section has turned to the decline of the Ivy heyday. The stance here at Ivy Style HQ is that 1967 was either the beginning of the end, or the end of the end. The top photo is from the heyday, when college men sported jackets and


March Tradness

In honor of March Madness, which begins today, Ivy-Style pays tribute to Bill Bradley, the 1965 National Player of the Year for Princeton. At the time, the school had produced more American presidents than basketball All-Americans. Bradley made the cover of the December 7th, 1964 issue of Sports Illustrated, complete with classic Princeton haircut. (Shot