Jazz

The Cool and the Beautiful

In the arts and culture, generally things are either cool or beautiful. Marcello Mastroianni in “La Dolce Vita” is cool, while beauty is what happens between 1:18 and 2:59 in the third movement of Brahms’ Piano Trio in C Minor. “Cool” didn’t exist before midcentury, while since then the quaint notion that art should be



Blue and Sentimental

Blue Note Records, a name synonymous with jazz, turns 70 this year. Blue Note has come a long way since its first boogie-woogie piano recording of an after-hours session with Albert Ammons and Meade Lux Lewis. Started by German immigrant and jazz enthusiast Alfred Lion, and aided by photographer Francis Wolfe, the label became the


Ears Wide Open

New contributing writer Scott Byrnes, who works in finance in San Francisco, was inspired by an Ivy Style jazz post and herein offers one of his own. I was in the middle of a long moving process when I read Ivy Style’s “All That Jazz” article, which inspired me to dig through boxes and pull


No Picture

Art of Noise

“Jazz is just insolent noise,” says Dickie Greenleaf’s father in “The Talented Mr. Ripley.” And no one’s noise is more sublimely insolent than skin-beater Art Blakey’s. For your visual and aural enjoyment, Ivy Style presents three clips of jazz-ivy style that may look buttoned-down, but certainly don’t sound that way. “I Remember Clifford,” by Art


All That Jazz

On assignment for the online magazine at RalphLauren.com, Ivy Style founder Christian Chensvold muses on that brief point in time when jazz musicians went for the clean-cut look, which, considering many of them were junkies, was the only clean thing about them. Sometime around 1954, jazz great Miles Davis walked into the Andover Shop, a