The Legendary Take Ivy Film

Just five years ago, 1965 photo book “Take Ivy” was a rarity. Most sat proudly on the book shelves of Ivy fans in Japan, with a few battered copies showing up time to time on Japanese auction sites for absurd prices. But now thanks to Men’s Club and powerHouse Books’ recent reprints, T. Hayashida’s photos


Penthouse Serenade: Hef on Ivy, 1960

If you’re a sucker for the “Mad Men” vibe of cool dudes, sexy chicks and midcentury style, you should really check out “Playboy’s Penthouse,” Hugh Hefner’s variety show from the early days of his budding Playboy empire. Episodes are available on DVD, including through Netflix. The episodes were taped in a party atmosphere that brought


DiCaprio As Gatsby In New Baz Luhrmann Production

The battle between old money and new wages again as Leonardo DiCaprio takes on the role of Jay Gatsby in a new adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1926 novel “The Great Gatsby.” The film, which begins shooting soon in Australia, will be helmed by director Baz Luhrmann (“Moulin Rouge,” “Romeo + Juliet,” “Strictly Ballroom”). While

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Brooks Brothers Fall 2011 Promo Videos

Last week Brooks Brothers released its Fall 2011 promotional videos on YouTube. The youth-oriented clips continue the “Back To Campus” and “Back To Town” themes. Above is the latter video, which, minus a two-second intro and outro, clocks in at 90 seconds. According to my calculations — and I may have blinked — there are


The Man in the Brooks Brothers Shirt

For Ivy Style’s 300th post, London-based contributor Rebecca C. Tuite examines the most important piece of literature about The Ivy League Look’s most important brand. There is little doubt that Mary Mccarthy’s short story “The Man in the Brooks Brothers Shirt” is now probably more famous for its punchy title — a dream for the

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Metro Retro: Siskel & Ebert on Metropolitan, 1990

Twenty years ago writer/director Whit Stillman released “Metropolitan,” set during the height of the debutante ball season between Christmas and New Year’s. No other film has examined the preppy class with such wit and originality, and unlike lesser preppy films from the ’80s, “Metropolitan” is as timeless as its indeterminate temporal setting. The clip above


Jazz vs. Ivy: All The Fine Young Cannibals, 1960

Jazz and Ivy duel for the affections of Natalie Wood in “All the Fine Young Cannibals,” a largely forgotten melodrama released a half a century ago. The film has not been released on DVD, but there are used VHS copies floating about, and if you search the web you might find a digital version. “All


Wet Behind The Ears: White Squall, 1996

I recently discovered the movie “White Squall,” directed by Ridley Scott and starring Jeff Bridges. Set in 1961, it’s a coming-of-age film crossed with maritime adventure. The story centers around a group of prep-school flunkies who get to redeem themselves in a kind of nautical reform school, doing their studies at sea while they learn

Princeton Newsreel, 1961

Our latest video from the Princeton Campus Life channel on YouTube is just the thing to get you in the mood for the release of “Take Ivy” next week. It’s another long one, but worth watching in full. Students in jackets and ties make their first appearance at 4:26, and return repeatedly, so be patient


Ivy League Killers, 1959

Just how much was the Ancient Eight a part of pop culture during the heyday of the Ivy League Look? Enough to inspire a B movie like 1959’s “Ivy League Killers,” whose title, reeking of both murder and elitism, was sure to have kids across the nation flocking to drive-ins. The film (which was made


Southern Comfort: Shag The Movie, 1989

“Take Ivy” is full of students wearing shorts, untucked oxfords and Weejuns without socks. This begs the question: Did the look originate on Yankee campuses, or did the practice originate in the South, with Southern students taking the look North with them when they headed off to college? Made in 1989 and set in Myrtle


P-Unit Forever: Behind the Scenes of Tea Partay

OK, you just read the headline, saw the embedded video, and you’re snickering. Let me explain. When I founded this site, I vowed never to post the Smirnoff “Tea Partay” video, which had become infamous in the online world of Tradsville. But I recently began covering digital marketing for Yahoo!, and found myself chatting with

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Buttoned-Down Beatnik: Ginsberg Biopic “Howl” Gets Sept. Release

A few months ago I heard about the Allen Ginsberg biopic “Howl,” and asked the production company if there were any upcoming screenings. There weren’t, as the film had yet to find a distributor. It’s got one now, and is scheduled for release on September 24. The film focuses on the poet’s 1957 obscenity trial


Mission Accomplished: Robert Culp, 1930-2010

Last week saw the passing of actor Robert Culp, who starred in the ’60s TV show “I Spy.” Last year Ivy-Style contributor Zachary DeLuca wrote a fine tribute to the show, in which Culp plays a former tennis star turned secret agent generously costumed in natural-shouldered suits and buttondown collars. The post can be found


The Preppy Beatnik

As a follow-up to our previous post on the bohemian in the Brooks Brothers suit, here’s cheers to Charlie Dalton, aka Nuwanda, the rebellious rich kid in “Dead Poets Society” who has a brief affair with a saxophone and beret. I wonder whatever became of Charlie. — CC


Secrets of Sprezzatura: The Messed-Up Shirt Collar

Do your outfits look stiff and contrived? Do you have a tendency to wear matching pants and saddle shoes? What you need is a dash of sprezzatura — deliberately calculated nonchalance — to give yourself a more devil-may-care, deshabille appearance. Here’s a quick fix in three easy steps: 1) When you launder an oxford-cloth buttondown,


GI Bill: Mr. Thomas and His Postwar Khakis

Bruce Boyer herein presents his first piece for Ivy-Style, an interview with Bill Thomas of Bill’s Khakis. Khakis and jeans are the iconic American work pants, both having been around for over a century but coming into global status after World War II. The democratizing effect of these trousers — everyone from top CEOs and

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Disco Revival: Whit Stillman on Life and Film

Whit Stillman’s 1998 film “The Last Days of Disco” was released this week, the last of his three films to make it to DVD. Several articles and interviews have hit the web as a result. Time Out New York has a short interview with Stillman, in which he talks about why he hasn’t made a


Lemmon-tations of a Company Man

Our Jack Lemmon series concludes with a look at 1964’s “Good Neighbor Sam,” in which Lemmon plays a wholesome family man who works in San Francisco at — what else? — an advertising agency. He commutes over the Golden Gate Bridge from Marin County, which I too did for a while. Did you know the


Bow Ties and Bongos

Our Jack Lemmon tribute continues with a look at two films in which he plays supporting roles. In 1958’s “Bell, Book and Candle,” Lemmon stars as a warlock who plays bongos with a suit-clad jazz combo in a Greenwich Village beatnik club. Kim Novak is the female lead in one of the sexiest roles ever


Cocktails For Two

Our Jack Lemmon movie marathon commences with a retraction. When I did a post on the 50th anniversary of “Breakfast at Tiffany’s,” I wrote that director Blake Edwards never again reached such heights. That may be true, but he certainly reached greater depths. I’d always avoided “Days of Wine and Roses,” as I just never


When LIFE Gives You Lemmons

This is the first in a series of posts on actor Jack Lemmon, which will include movie recommendations and sartorial screen shots. But we’ll start things off with a few photos from the LIFE Magazine archives.


Tea and Sympathy, 1956

“Tea and Sympathy” was mentioned recently in one of the articles reprinted from Ivy Magazine. It’s also on the reading list featured in the “Official Preppy Handbook.” I figured it was time to check it out. Written by Robert Anderson for the stage, “Tea and Sympathy” was adapted for the screen in 1956 with Vincente


Go Daddy-O: Happy Father’s Day from Ivy-Style

This Father’s Day, why not do something really classic and take your cue from the TV show “My Three Sons”? Simply put on your finest suits and share an exciting father-son bicycle ride. It’s certainly more original than playing catch in the backyard. Airing from 1960-1972, “My Three Sons” centered around a single father raising



Mid-century TV shows such as Dragnet, Bewitched and My Three Sons are rich in sartorial eye candy. But rarely does a show provide the perfect combination of great writing, great acting, and great tailoring. Get Smart is often lauded in this regard, but it is really little more than slapstick. Those seeking a more serious program for