Casual Friday: Golf & Tennis For Birchbox’s Summer Friday Series

Besides the obvious things like career and family, the two things for me that make life worth living are art and sport. During the winter I’m more focused on the art side (typically concerts), while in the summer I like to play outdoors. So when Birchbox, a company that introduces you to new stuff via


From Shoe To Douche: The Fall Of The House Of Biff

In 1960 Biff wore J. Press and played tennis. That same year he sired Biff Jr., who in 1986 wore Lacoste and Brooks and played squash. That same year Biff Jr. brought into this world Biff III, who would go on to wear Abercrombie & Fitch and Vineyard Vines and play lacrosse. Biff the elder


The 2013 Masters Popped Collar Award

Competition is fierce today during the final round of the Masters. And while we’ve no idea who’ll be wearing the green jacket tonight, Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano wins the green polo. While his American opponents have played the past four days clad in logo-laden, mercerized and moisture-wicking technologically enhanced golf shirts, Spain’s Fernandez-Castano has played each day


Cold-Weather Golf Gear, Pt. II

I gave my girlfriend a new set of golf clubs for Christmas, and like a kid with a new toy she couldn’t wait to try them out. So we finished our pancakes and coffee, bundled up, and headed out to the course. Last year I did a post on cold-weather golf gear, and here I


Olympics, You Know: Walk Don’t Run, 1966

Today, you may have heard, is the start of the Games of the Thirtieth Olympiad. Likewise, “It’s the Olympics, you know?” is a running line from the comedy “Walk, Don’t Run,” which is set amid the chaos of the 1964 Tokyo games. The city is so overburdened that stars Cary Grant and Jim Hutton are


A Year In The Life

One year ago today I hit a golf ball for the first time. Since then I’ve hit 20,000 more. Every day for the past 365 days I’ve played golf, practiced it, watched it, read about it, or thought about it. When I haven’t been outdoors hitting balls, I’ve been rolling them across the purple putting

This Is Pennsylvania, 1957

Recently I ran across a video for Penn that was created in 1957 and documents campus life for a full 30 minutes. There’s some really great footage in here, and you are able to see a lot of detail that’s not as noticeable with still-frame photos like you get in “Take Ivy.” Here are some


March Madras: Brooks, Press, RL, Gant, O’Connell’s & Ben Silver

March Madras continues with this updated post with two more sartorial jump balls. In the first, J. Press squares off against Gant. Wearing an almost blinding uniform, J. Press offers a traditional madras sportcoat priced at $495. But shouldn’t this guy have graduated by now? In contrast to Press’ perennial classic, Gant offers classic-with-a-twist. Its


On The Tea: Cold Weather Golf Gear

Golfing in December requires a thermos full of Prince of Wales tea and several layers of clothing. Here’s how I do it: Rugby shawl-collared pullover Polo Ralph Lauren polo shirt Lands’ End jersey turtleneck Lands’ End flannel-lined cords Tweed cap Herringbone gloves Brooks Brothers engine-turned belt Etonic white saddle golf shoes in Harris Tweed bag


What A Catch: Vassar Versus Ivies Touch Football

“Vassar College’s touch football team today issued a challenge to the Kennedy family in Washington: play us,” announced The Poughkeepsie Journal in November 1962. The reason for such sporting confidence? In the fall of that year, Vassar students had formed the first all-female college touch football teams. With names like the Joss Jocks, Noyes Nymphs


Fore In Hand: How I Learned To Golf At Brooks Brothers

Brooks Brothers’ Madison Avenue flagship is a great place to pick up a striped tie. It’s also a great place to learn the world’s most difficult sport. I’ve played a lot of sports in my life — probably 15 or so if you count things like kayaking and mountain biking. Fencing, badminton and swing dancing


On Point: Chens on Fencing for Ralph Lauren Magazine

My latest piece for Ralph Lauren Magazine is on the rise of American fencing. I spent about five years training up to five days a week and faced the national champion several times (the first time losing 5-0 in 45 seconds; the last time a more respectable 5-3). At the time, US fencing was barely

Le Crocodile: How Lacoste Became The Preppy Polo of Choice

By 1980 it was crystal clear: “The sport shirt of choice is Lacoste,” declared The Official Preppy Handbook. “Only the all-cotton model will do, the one with cap sleeves with the ribbed edging, narrow collar and two-button placket (never buttoned).” How did a French shirt with a crocodile for a logo become the go-to preppy polo?


Bicycle Week: A Velocipede Miscellany

Yeah that headline is a bit florid. But hey, this ain’t Bike Week continues (not concludes) with a random assortment of images. First, the Gant bicycle, which was released about a year ago with a price tag of $995. Only 25 were made available in the US, and as of a month ago there


Bicycle Week: The Yale-Vassar Bike Race

The Yale-Vassar bike race found its origins in a drunken wager. At a meeting of Yale’s Trumbull Beer and Bike Society, one student declared he could beat another in a bicycle race all the way to Vassar. However, this valiant duel between two determined Trumbull residents quickly became a popular annual tradition in the early


Backward Pass: A Short History of Ivy League Football

In honor of The Game this weekend, Ivy Style’s Elder Statesman Bill Stephenson shares his thoughts on Ivy League football. Stephenson graduated from the University of Oklahoma (current BCS ranking: 14) in 1954, but presently lives in Princeton, where he cheers for the home team, which ranks a bit lower. It doesn’t seem possible to

Princeton vs. Yale, 1955

It’s kind of funny to think that standards of dress for a football game half a century ago were higher than for much of corporate America today. Several shots of the crowd reveal all the requisite gear: natural shoulders, buttondown collars, rep ties, short haircuts, and crewneck sweaters worn high in the front. — CC

Princeton Crew, 1948-50

This is a 20-minute clip, so watch it over lunch if you’re the kind of poor schlub who eats lunch at his desk. And if you’re at home, pour yourself a drink and get comfortable. Love the towel worn as a scarf in the opening. Great chinos and sweaters in action at 2:28. Jackets and


Well Spoken: Remembering Yankees Announcer Bob Sheppard

Bob Sheppard, the legendary public address announcer for the New York Yankees from 1951 to 2007, died on July 11th at the age of 99. He was raised in Queens and went to St. John’s University, where he won seven letters and served as senior class president, and later returned to serve as a speech


Twilight in Vermont: The Rise and Fall of the Moriarty Ski Hat

If there’s one character in “The Official Preppy Handbook” who could be singled out for derision, it’s the skier. Wearing mirrored sunglasses and a cocky sneer, he looks like the kind of guy you’d hate everything about. Everything, that is, except his ski cap from Moriarty of Stowe, Vermont. For five decades the Moriarty cap


Perfect Form: The Best Dressed Golfer of 1936

AldenPyle of Andy’s Trad Forum, one of the most diligent ransackers of the LIFE archives, recently dug up some photos of the 1936 National Amateur Golf Championship at the Garden City Golf Club. The winner was John W. Fischer, who took the cup not only for his fine form on the fairway, but for being


Class of ’16: Great-Grandpa’s Raccoon Coat

How many posts are we going to do on raccoon coats? Answer: as long as we keep getting fresh material, which in this case was supplied by Yale undergrad Riley Ford, who wore his great-granddad’s coonskin coat to The Game. Yeah, we realize that was six weeks ago: The kid had to finish finals. For


Third-String Rummy: Donald Rumsfeld at Princeton

Last spring, when I found this New Yorker article on the Ivy League Football Association, football season was already over and baseball was in the air. I’ve been sitting on it ever since and if I don’t post it now, I’ll forget and another season will be gone. It’s not much: The main revelation is


The Game

The annual Harvard-Yale football game — known to students and alumni simply as The Game — has been played since 1875 and alternates each year between Harvard Stadium and the Yale Bowl. The Game is famous for its always-waning-but-never-quite-dead tradition of genteel tailgating, nowadays conducted alongside college parties more squarely within the “Animal House” tradition.