No Country For Young Men

youngmensshop

With competition from chain brands and the Internet, Charlottesville, Virginia has become no country for young men — The Young Men’s Shop, that is.

The independent, family-run store was christened in 1927, but doesn’t cater to young men much any more. From an article on its impending close, owner Harry Marshall says his shop “caters mostly to locals, including doctors and lawyers, but he said his clothes are for anyone wanting to look professional. ‘We’re sort of a middle-of-the-road store,’ Marshall said. “Most of the merchandise we carry is made in the U.S. and we still offer tailoring, and just old-fashioned service.’”

Head over here to read about this loss of one of the few-remaining independly, family owned traditional menswear shops. There’s also a short video clip with the owner in buttondown and bow tie, which makes the shop itself not the only loss to the community: a seasoned trad dresser plans to spend most of his time at the golf course. But perhaps he’ll set an example there, too. — CC

6 Comments on "No Country For Young Men"

  1. Charlottesville | March 8, 2016 at 12:44 pm |

    Thanks, Christian, for this post about a local loss to folks in my part of the world. My father bought 3/2 suits from the Young Men’s Shop in the 1970s, and I have enjoyed shopping there over the past 20 years or so. I used to have an office a block or so away, and would stop by at least weekly. Harry Marshall has become a friend to many of us, as well as a merchant and he and his shop will be much missed on the downtown scene. Eljo’s alone remains as a truly Trad source in a town that once had at least 4 traditional clothiers.

  2. The Loafer Lawyer | March 8, 2016 at 2:58 pm |

    I may have been a bit of an anachronism but, in the early 1990s the Young Man’s Shop catered to this collegian’s preference for blue ocbd. LL Bean by mail, Leggett’s at the Mall, Young Man’s Shop on the Downtown Mall, Eljo’s (at the time, located on Elliewood) and Mincer’s (for UVa apparel) on The Corner, provided 3/4 of my (semi-) southern fraternity boy style vibe. Sad, may have to take a side trip for one last purchase. Thank you for the news.

  3. Charlottesville | March 9, 2016 at 11:07 am |

    Loafer — Sounds like we had some similar experiences. I stopped by YMS yesterday and picked up a couple of things, as much for old times’ sake as anything. There are some nice looking bowties if that is of any interest, Alan Paine Shetland and cashmere sweaters, as well as A&E shoes, Gitman shirts and other choice items. In addition to the stores you mention, Ed Michtom’s supplied Polo shirts, ties and suits in the 70s and 80s, and a shop near YMS on Main Street, the name of which I can’t recall, was the best spot for Shetland sweaters (Dean’s of Scotland cables in bright colors and pastels for the girls, more subdued varieties for the boys). Looks like Eljo’s will get most of what is left of the local trad trade.

  4. The Loafer Lawyer | March 9, 2016 at 12:57 pm |

    C’Ville – Sadly, a trip to the downtown mall is no quick errand. I do not recall Ed Michtom’s, but do remember there being a store that seemed to specialize in sweaters. I was not a big sweater enthusiast, but at least one stylish young lady dragged me in to the store. The sweater finally saw its last hurrah this past fall. Probably the same store.

  5. Charlottesville | March 9, 2016 at 3:52 pm |

    Loafer — Sounds like you need a replacement for that sweater. I just recalled the name of the long gone shop: Page-Foster. Hope you can make it to YMS at some point for a new sweater to keep the nostalgia for bygone C’ville trad stores alive for another few decades.

  6. Allen Groves | March 23, 2016 at 11:30 am |

    I’m wearing an Austin Reed jacket from the Young Men’s Shop as I’m writing this. It’s a great loss for Charlottesville and traditional style. Harry Marshall is also a terrific gentleman. As a UVA Law alum and now Dean of Students, I will miss that store. I have referred many students to YMS and Eljo’s (happily, the latter remains).

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