Portrait Of A Gentleman In The Age of iPhones

paul1

Yesterday I popped into Paul Winston‘s place and immediately noticed something different. Paul was wearing a jacket. In all the times I’ve visited him, it’s either been balmy weather or the heater’s been cranked up. But yesterday was cool and crisp outside with no climate-controlling inside, and Paul confessed to feeling a bit chilly.

I immediately took out my iPhone and snapped a few shots, only to discover when I got home that they were all a blurry, disappointing mess. I’ll never again count on a telephone to do the job of a camera. I’ve tinkered with the files in iPhoto in the vain effort of amelioration, but the shot above doesn’t do justice to the great full-body I took that unfortunately l00ks like Paul is sitting across from you at a three-martini lunch.

The addition of the tweed jacket made Paul the epitome of the Old Money Look, and all you young fogeys should immediately copy this outfit for an air of degagé sophistication. The sportcoat is 35 years old and made by his family brand Chipp. It’s three-button and undarted, but with shaping at the waist — one of the things that distinguished Chipp from Brooks and Press, Paul pointed out. His emblematic tie depicts vintage fire trucks.

But my favorite part of the outfit is the contrast between the frayed shirt cuffs and the collar pin, a masterpiece of Advanced Style.

Below the waist the tour-de-force of nonchalance is complete: grey trousers, white athletic socks, and half-destroyed camp moccasins. I want to be old enough to be this cool. — CC

paul2

52 Comments on "Portrait Of A Gentleman In The Age of iPhones"

  1. or you could learn to hold your phone steady

  2. Thanks, Sal, I’ll practice that.

  3. Richard Meyer | October 7, 2014 at 9:51 am |

    Paul is the best; my tailor for 30+ years. He and Charlie Davidson and Richard press are the last of a breed.

  4. Richard Meyer | October 7, 2014 at 9:53 am |

    Note the collar pin

  5. Great pictures despite the blur. Love the bunching of his sleeves underneath the jacket; makes me want to convert to trad fit shirts. (Almost.)

  6. Paul is a gentleman and a scholar of the trade.

  7. Love the look with exception of the Nike swoosh. Living in flyover country, receiving the Chipps’ catalogue was always a special day.

    For some of you, Mr. winston wearing a firetruck club tie makes him an apostate because he’s not a fireman. 😉

  8. Apologies, “Winston”, damn wireless keyboard.

  9. The Nike socks is the perfect “don’t give a damn” touch, and the difference between middle-aged iGents from a man old enough to truly not give a damn.

  10. Love it!

  11. “The addition of the tweed jacket made Paul the epitome of the Old Money Look, and all you young fogeys should immediately copy this outfit for an air of degagé sophistication.” Well said.

    Contrast Mr. Winston’s genuine style with all the bloggers and iGents out there. No rules, no thrifted sh!t, no care for other’s rules – just a mature style based on quality clothes that have stood the test of time.

    Chipp always gave me the impression of the London Drape. Forgotten example of how quality clothes, construction, and tailoring are always paramount, not just the look which is the only thing the novice will aspire too.

  12. NaturalShoulder | October 7, 2014 at 1:12 pm |

    I hope my travels bring me to NYC so I can have a suit made by Paul.

  13. E: Just a quick quibbling point. For some of us, “thrifted sh!t” is the only way to acquire the “mature style” based on “quality clothes, construction, and tailoring”, especially since the alternative is largely limited to overpriced, over-tight, tailbone-skimming sport jackets.

  14. A.E.W. Mason | October 7, 2014 at 4:21 pm |

    Being in someone’s presence can change an impression, I’ll acknowledge. Based on the pictures alone, I think it’s over the top, so it doesn’t work for me. It’s gone into parody or caricature of itself; not the intended effect, but nevertheless. Taking it that far also makes it self-conscious which means it’s self-defeating.

  15. Lapel width. A circa 70s make?

    Great looking glen check. I see green, rust, tan…

    I’ll guess Shetland tweed. 12 ounce. Lovat Mill?

    That said, it brings to mind two patterns in HFW’s current lambswool lineup:

    https://shop.hfwltd.com/collection/25

    See 7710 and 7711.

  16. Since this post is in large part about the tweed jacket, I’ll expand on Mason’s comment. Often the only way to get quality tweeds (and the more interesting patterns and colors), short of going bespoke or paying $600+ on a limited array of patterns, is to thrift them. I have 8 Harris tweed and 7 other tweed jackets, about half in the sack style, that are in great condition and high quality. Average cost after dry cleaning was around $12.
    I live in a part of the country with a cool fall and winter climate so there are many of these jackets available. You might get lucky too.

  17. “I want to be old enough to be this cool.”

    Me too.

  18. Unfortunately, my brother in law passed away suddenly last week at age 56, due to a heart attack. At the funeral, I wore a $6 thrift shop navy blazer (at least 30 years old, but positively new condition), khakis, blue candy stripe button down shirt, and a club tie with a golf club motif. Argyle socks, loafers, and 1940’s tank watch (my late Dad’s) completed the outfit.

    Another brother in law mentioned that I looked positively stately. His wife didn’t seem to appreciate his comment, though. Very few jackets and ties in the crowd. Even the decedent had just a LS sport shirt on, a shade of burnt orange.

    The blazer outfit was as casual as I was going to get.

  19. Worried Man | October 7, 2014 at 8:02 pm |

    Those socks, man… those socks. I can get how one can arrive at cool through nonchalance, but the socks are really where the train runs off the rails here.

  20. Nice jacket and pants.

  21. Vern Trotter | October 7, 2014 at 10:34 pm |

    Just great! Coat and tie pin are classic. The socks and frayed cuffs are his individual don’t give a damn comment and after all, he is in his own bolt hole! I have a cache of dozens of old OCBDs that are similar and I think I might wear again; most likely I never will. The subsequent trip to the laundry would produce something truly unwearable.

    I enjoy stopping in to see him. The neckties alone are good for a good belly laugh!

  22. Trad Hunter | October 8, 2014 at 2:12 am |

    I’m with Worried Man on this one.

    The jacket (obviously well cared for and worn not too frequently) is great.

    But the rest is a mess.

    It is simply eccentricity and is not pleasing to the eye.

  23. Richard Meyer | October 8, 2014 at 2:42 am |

    If you want a suit or jacket, hurry. Paul may be closing the tailor business soon.

  24. @ AEW Mason … I think you’re missing the point. This fellow gives exactly zero shits if his look “works for you”. There is no “intended effect”…. that’s the message.

  25. Worried Man | October 8, 2014 at 7:51 am |

    But men not giving a shit is why so many men look like shit. I’m all for people doing their own thing and expressing their individuality or just not giving a hoot, and I’m not passing judgement on him as a person because of his socks, but… those socks, man.

  26. Trad Hunter | October 8, 2014 at 9:31 am |

    Frayed cuffs, Nike socks and decrepit loafers are not cool. Not that being cool is really anything important to aim for.

    I’m sure he’s a lovely guy, but so are plenty of hobos.

  27. Worried Man | October 8, 2014 at 10:32 am |

    ^
    I’m not so sure TH. You could be on to something here. Next week I plan to roll out my Wino Ivy Etsy shop. Deliciously frayed OCBDs, threadbare tweeds, perfectly stained novelty ties, used athletic socks, and crusty loafers. Just give me your measurements and I provide the entire outfit, guaranteed by me to lend the perfect air of authenticity. First 10 customers receive a half-full bottle of Manischewitz wine tucked into the patch pocket, for that doubtless credibility. Sorry, no returns.

  28. Boston Bean | October 8, 2014 at 11:12 am |

    Always a pleasure to see a gentleman of the old school who doesn’t feel the need to wear P3 eyeglasses in order to conform to preppy/trad/ivy “rules”.

  29. E: Just a quick quibbling point. For some of us, “thrifted sh!t” is the only way to acquire the “mature style” based on “quality clothes, construction, and tailoring”, especially since the alternative is largely limited to overpriced, over-tight, tailbone-skimming sport jackets.

    Alternatives abound if you know where to look and are resourceful;. Andover Shop, O’Connell’s etc. Your problem isn’t that it’s limited, its that you can’t bank roll the look you are after. End of the day you should be investing in a wardrobe that coordinates well with itself and is comprised of quality pieces that last. That is what most folks just don’t seem to learn from the internet becasue no one is really espousing it. Tinseth hit it squarely on the head in his Tumblr not to long ago. The novice is just all about the look.

    Anyone can build a wonderful wardrobe suited to their lifestyle if they invest wisely and proceed slowly. There is no need to waste time in a thrift store.

  30. Trad Hunter | October 8, 2014 at 11:51 am |

    @ Worried Man

    You could be on to a winner, given the enthusiasm for the ‘threadbare look’ on this board at least.

    And of course we have the instance of pre-worn Levis sewn on to virgin bit of denim in the 60s and sold as new at a premium to assure us that this business model might well take off.

  31. Worried Man | October 8, 2014 at 2:15 pm |

    Regarding thrifted clothes, I’m a staunch believer. Just because it’s used doesn’t mean it’s not of high quality or isn’t going to last as long as a brand new item. I’ve got plenty of great thrifted items – Press, Brooks, Southwick, the Co-ops, etc – and they are all pristine. I buy new stuff too, but I see no reason not to pick and choose. Plus, I’m into some of the older styling – a slightly longer jacket, slim lapel, etc. – that is often hard to come by in new offerings. I can really overlook the fact that a jacket or suit is slightly used, although in perfect condition, if if fits, is of high quality, was made in the U.S., and is going to cost me $900 less than a new item of comparable quality. But some people just aren’t into the idea of used clothing, and I can understand that just fine.

  32. Trad Hunter | October 8, 2014 at 2:32 pm |

    Comment by E — October 8, 2014 @ 11:50 am

    “Anyone can build a wonderful wardrobe suited to their lifestyle if they invest wisely and proceed slowly. There is no need to waste time in a thrift store.”

    Life is short. Move too slowly and you’re dead before you’ve built that wardrobe,

  33. I stopped by my local thrift store last week and came home with these:

    http://www.ivy-style.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/IMG_1520.jpg

  34. Christian, wasn’t there something just like what you found on page 72 of The Official Preppy Handbook?

  35. Worried Man | October 8, 2014 at 4:22 pm |

    Christian, those are pretty neat looking pieces. I’ve been finding some nice old books lately, one being a large hardback compendium of mid-century modern architectural case studies published in I think 1957. Makes a great coffee table book.

  36. E nicely sums up the classist underpinnings of those few longing to hold on to the days when only the wealthy could afford to dress a certain way. Your keen eye can get net you bargins galore in thirft shops. I’ve personally walked out of Goodwill’s with several hundered dollars worth of Ivy wear in my hands that I purchased for pennies. For E it appears it’s not the quality of the clothes,rather, it’s how much you paid for them which I think exemplifies the current iGent, Tumblr atitude towards fashion more than anything mentioned so far.

  37. A.E.W. Mason | October 8, 2014 at 5:26 pm |

    @gornergrat

    A “message” is the product of intent, by definition. And there is, as you’ve observed, a “message.” A collar pin, with its nattiness, worn with a shirt otherwise, apparently, coming apart, might be described as ostentatious. In any case, the whole of the outfit — regardless of Mr. Winston’s state of mind in piecing it together — is a visual montage of sorts. There is no reason to suspect that by revealing that it doesn’t work “for me,” I was implying that he cared what I thought.

  38. Worried Man | October 8, 2014 at 5:34 pm |

    ^
    I knew I could trust someone to point that out.

  39. Bob Templeton | October 8, 2014 at 7:23 pm |

    “I want to be old enough to be this cool.”

    That statement is the most appropriate statement for this site. I agree whole heartedly. To reach the age, or the stature, to be “this cool” would be what most of us aspire to be.

    Yes, yes, yes. You said it exactly!

  40. I’ve always thought that your personal style should reflect you and your life experiences. Raised as a WASP, for example, I’ve always assumed that wearing shirts with button-down collars with suits is fine because everyone that I knew growing up did it. I still do it. And the people that I grew up with also still do it.

    And from the point of view of that particular sub-species, people who think that button-down collars with suits aren’t acceptable just think that because they’re not one of “us.” That’s not a value judgment. There’s nothing inherently good of bad in either point of view. And neither one is inherently right or wrong. But one seems to reflect a certain set of life experiences that the other doesn’t.

    In light of that particular view, I also think that lots of bloggers and iGents are really trying to be someone that they’re not. They’re rebelling against their prep school’s dress code, but they never suffered through a prep school, etc.

    Mr. Winston definitely isn’t doing this. And even though you may not approve of certain aspects of the way that he’s dressed in these pictures (I’m not fond of his white socks, for example), they definitely seem to reflect a fairly clear view of who he is. And, at the end of the day, that’s what I think that your personal style should reflect.

    And at last count I had 37 Chipp ties. That’s definitely more than I need, but it’s also not as many as I’d like to have. And, oddly enough, I actually have one or two more Lilly Pulitzer ties than I have Chipp ties. It’s almost certainly a sign that something’s clearly wrong when you own more LP stuff than your wife does.

  41. This piece on Paul reinforces a thought I had when I saw the new work space of Jay Walters. http://www.ivy-style.com/index.php?s=jay
    Even though we feature these individuals their history and shops, these places are for the true cognoscenti. The barrier to enter into the world of ivy, made to measure and bespoke is not the money but the psychological hurdle the potential customer has placed in front of themselves. How can these eclectic dressers and barebones shops stripped of the faux patina of RL old money bric brac square with the preconceived expectations of the consumer? For some it cannot for others their faults are evidence of the authentic. To know the Paul Winstons, Jay Walters and Charlie Davidsons of the world and to patronize them in any capacity is to be a true believer. As an aside I think that is the first time I have seen Paul in a jacket.

  42. When I saw the picture of Paul I instantly thought of Larry Sanders’ agent Sid (as played by the great Phil Leeds)
    http://www.iforce.co.nz/View.aspx?i=k0ld1riq.rpa.png

  43. Of course, ‘Sid’ was actually Hank Kingsley’s agent!

  44. Trad Hunter | October 9, 2014 at 2:42 am |

    Comment by Halby — October 8, 2014 @ 5:17 pm

    E nicely sums up the classist underpinnings of those few longing to hold on to the days when only the wealthy could afford to dress a certain way. Your keen eye can get net you bargins galore in thirft shops. I’ve personally walked out of Goodwill’s with several hundered dollars worth of Ivy wear in my hands that I purchased for pennies. For E it appears it’s not the quality of the clothes,rather, it’s how much you paid for them which I think exemplifies the current iGent, Tumblr atitude towards fashion more than anything mentioned so far.

    Obviously, E can speak for himself.

    But you seriously need to learn to read. You really do.

  45. Re: “I want to be old enough to be this cool.”

    I hope I’m this cool when I’m this old.

  46. Young Curmudgeon | October 9, 2014 at 9:53 am |

    According to my calculations, Mr. Winston is now 75. It’s wonderful to see a man at that age who looks so cool.

    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/05/27/a-tailor-who-caters-to-a-certain-taste/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0

  47. “The lapels on a tasteful and well cut coat like this from the 70′s owes much to the 1930′s.”

    Right you are, Mr. Mason

    The IvySphere, populated by a few who remain obsessed with certain subcultures circa the 60s, is a small and not infrequently odd chapter in the much larger story that is 20th century American natural shoulder style. Three cheers for the eras when lapels, ties, and pants weren’t uber skinny. By this I mean nearly the entirety of the last century save a few years.

    Flipping through the pages of a book on the history of Princeton football, I was drawn to the pictures of the great Charlie Caldwell. There he is, looking his Brooks best–natural, sloping shoulder and striped repp tie (at least 3.5″ at the blade). Here’s another of Caldwell at what may be a pre-game bonfire:

    https://blogs.princeton.edu/mudd/files/2012/11/AC112MP130_3521_1950.jpg

  48. ^
    That is a picture of perfection right there.

  49. Aside from the jacket sleeve being about a foot too long.

  50. A.E.W. Mason | October 10, 2014 at 2:34 pm |

    @S.E.

    I was in RL killing time before a meeting last week and was pleased to see a tweed sport coat with lapels much like those on Mr. Caldwell’s coat. The RL salesman’s selling points were that it had completely natural shoulders and was unlined–it was unconstructed. Here is Mr. Coleman in another nice example from the 30’s. And, again, these proportions are very much like what Mr. Winston was wearing.

    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTcML4TWN6aerZOgXzLiYfJIjmbJ0K4t4fNfreAnPTCpQFvjm9P2Q

    The uber skinny fad is, I think, already on it’s way out. And, like all such things, is going to look somewhat silly as we look back at it. I’d say that the width of lapels and ties are to men what the length of skirts are to women. Well, maybe.

  51. The nice thing about not hopping on fads and chasing fashion like a greyhound chasing a fake rabbit at the track is that every decade or so you’re ahead of the trend. 😉

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