Made In America – The Only Thing The Muddy Dog Will Sell Out Is Product

I wanted to introduce you to another company that insists on Made In America, is downright fanatical about quality, and whose CEO has a Vision Board above her desk of images of who her customers are, and asks every day if she is giving them what they want. And to borrow from our phone conversation (which went happily from sprint to marathon) – “Your readers are my customers.” Now, that isn’t to say she has a picture of SE or Whiskeydent or Mitchell or Nevada up. I think she is speaking in broader terms.

But I never clarified that, so if you are reading this, you might be on a wall somewhere.

If you are reading this, I am sure you are on a wall somewhere.

Here. Meet Susan Dench.

This is Susan Dench. If you click on Susan you will go to her website, themuddydog.com. Please click on Susan. 🙂

Everything on her site is American made.  She insists on that.  It was one of the three things during our two hours on the phone that she was serious about.   We talked family, she has a pretty decent-sized one, and the need to make that time.   “If there is anything positive that we can make from the last two years,” she said, “it is that it is an opportunity to reinvent and redirect some things.  It would be a waste if we didn’t at least take a look at our lives and assess for a minute.  I know I did.  I binge-watched Netflix and I took a look.  And I became more committed than ever to the idea that time with people, relationships, family, has to be intentional.  If you wait for life to give you a window for that, it may not.  You have to make it.  Our products and designs are meant to make that time and window look as valuable as it really is.”

So this is a platter. With nautical charts. On the site (click the picture) they have like a gazillion locations. But that’s not my point. Ms. Dench has the eye of a designer, and the head of an engineer. When I tell you, she went into how these things have like gravity-defying properties, suffice to say she knows her polymers. (I don’t know my polymers, is polymers even the right word?). All I know is I asked for one for Father’s Day, and from the talk I had with her, I think it could double as a solar battery.

The second thing she was serious about is staying in her lane.  Beautiful things that create opportunities to put down the phone (NOT YET if you are reading this on a phone) and enjoy some life.   I said about Vineyard Vines (and as an aside, I LOVE Vineyard Vines and wear it all the time in the summer) that the company turned directions when it moved from “Our customer is people who buy these ties,” to “Our customer is people who wear ties.”   Ms. Dench is very well aware of that transition, and is set on avoiding it.   There is an aesthetic here, and she will not waiver.

But she has also created a lab (like experiment, not like dog) at her site.  There are opportunities all over the place to personalize the products.   It is kind of a unique spot, where you have the opportunity to be creative but you have expert guard rails to help.

The third thing she is serious about is quality.  Of her products, and of life.  “I know there are places you can buy ten plates for ten dollars, but that isn’t my customer.  My customer puts more emphasis on the look and feel of things, and is willing to pay something for that.  My customer is not extravagant by any means, but they are willing to buy things  that are both casual AND important,” she said.  “The cornhole boards I am making you, those are furniture quality.”

Good, because that’s a drinking game and people might end up sitting on one.

Cards for when you want to write me. Or each other. Or somebody. Write somebody.

The takeaway is this.  This is not a person looking to build a company.  In fact, if you go to the site the company is kind of beside the point.  Their branding is super discrete.  The product and the aesthetic are forward-facing.  The muddy dog is there, but you gotta look for it.  Instead, this is a company located in Maine, making beautiful things in America, and dedicated to a lifestyle that is as pleasing to the eye as it is to the soul.

The website is www.themuddydog.com, if you are so inclined go have a look.  I am buying the phone case with the fountain pen on it because it looks like mine.  And the rest of my family has a wishlist we are working our way through.

JB

 

 

10 Comments on "Made In America – The Only Thing The Muddy Dog Will Sell Out Is Product"

  1. whiskeydent | May 2, 2022 at 10:39 am | Reply

    I am indeed on a wall. It’s at the post office and I’m joined by nine other nice people.

  2. For years I’ve tried pretty hard to buy only MiUSA, and I think most people would prefer to buy only MiUSA, but then on a quadrennial basis, they knoweth not what they do. Kind of a weird, paying of corporate penance thing, I suppose.

  3. “If you are reading this, I am sure you are on a wall somewhere.” Yep.

  4. “This is not a person looking to build a company. In fact, if you go to the site the company is kind of beside the point. Their branding is super discrete. The product and the aesthetic are forward-facing. The muddy dog is there, but you gotta look for it. Instead, this is a company located in Maine, making beautiful things in America, and dedicated to a lifestyle that is as pleasing to the eye as it is to the soul.“

    Amen to this.

  5. Minimalist Trad | May 3, 2022 at 1:16 am | Reply

    Lovely lady, lovely smile, but I would have preferred simpler earrings, for the same reason that I prefer white OCBDs, critterless trousers, etc.

  6. …Is IKEA Ivy?

  7. Boston Bean | May 3, 2022 at 5:16 am | Reply

    @Nevada
    From my point of view, Ivy is minimalist; many of IKEA’s items are minimalist, too.

    Hi Boston, I dunno. A standard bearer shirt costs $150. A tie costs $80. I dunno if that is minimalist. – JB

  8. Minimalist Trad | May 3, 2022 at 3:01 pm | Reply

    JB,
    I know that your reply was directed at Boston Bean, but let me say that minimalism doesn’t come cheap. It has to do with simplicity and lack of ostention, rather than price. Having said that, one certainly doesn’t have to pay $150 for an OCBD.

    • John Burton | May 3, 2022 at 4:48 pm | Reply

      Hi! I am replying instead of just dropping in on your comment because I wanted to make sure you knew I replied that you are right, I stand corrected. I hadn’t thought about it the way you said it, now that I read your note, I see your point. – JB

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