Khakis, Chuck Taylors, And Cashmere Socks

Here’s another interesting image posted to Ivy’s Facebook group. The year is 1969, and you can try and guess the subject, who is directing a film (a task he is not chiefly remembered for). He is reportedly wearing his casual uniform, which consisted of khakis, Chuck Taylor canvas sneakers, and — because he’s a bit older and more well off than your average college student — socks made of cashmere. 

10 Comments on "Khakis, Chuck Taylors, And Cashmere Socks"

  1. Looks like Gene Kelly. He could afford cashmere socks…

  2. Peter Mayle, in “Acquired Tastes”, several times refers to some luxury item as being “as expensive and impractical as cashmere socks”. Their lack of longevity is definitely a first-world problem.

  3. James blevins | October 27, 2017 at 10:18 pm |

    I would say Gene Kelly too, and the movie is “Hello, Dolly,” whose big production numbers would require him to take up a microphone.

  4. I have the book mentioned above by NCJack. It is quite entertaining, covering many accoutrements of the good life; custom shirts, suits and shoes, cigars, truffles, caviar and other niceties as well as the aforementioned cashmere in a chapter appropriately titled “How The Rich Keep Warm.”

  5. Too bad cashmere socks don’t last long, I almost bought a pair from Polo. They’re dirt cheap at $250 and they’re made in Wales, by Corgi no doubt.

  6. Ha, speaking of books, check Fussell’s “Class” for proper use of the word “niceties”!

  7. whiskeydent | October 28, 2017 at 6:52 pm |

    Has to be Kelly. The doc in his lap has bars of music.

  8. Gene’s a man after my own heart, realising that even a light scarf, cashmere especially, will warm you up quicker than almost anything should it turn a bit nippy. But I’m sure there are those who would argue that the distilled contents of a hip flask will do the job far quicker.

  9. “a hip flask will do the job far quicker.”
    or two

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