Personae


No Picture

Outgoing and Determined: Remembering Tim Thompson

When Timothy Thompson, an 18-year-old from Ashland, Oregon, was chosen by LIFE Magazine to have his first semester at Yale chronicled, a massive challenge lay before him. Not only did he have to adapt to the school academically and socially, he had to do so while a reporter and photographer followed him around campus, capturing


No Picture

A LIFE in Brief: The Kennedy Clan

On newsstands now is one of those book-like magazines LIFE puts out when someone important dies — in this case, Edward Kennedy. “The Kennedys: End of a Dynasty” provides plenty of photos and family history for those who don’t want to wade through a full biography. I especially liked this photo of JFK from 1946.


No Picture

GI Bill: Mr. Thomas and His Postwar Khakis

Bruce Boyer herein presents his first piece for Ivy-Style, an interview with Bill Thomas of Bill’s Khakis. Khakis and jeans are the iconic American work pants, both having been around for over a century but coming into global status after World War II. The democratizing effect of these trousers — everyone from top CEOs and


No Picture

Pipes and Cardigans Get the Chicks

Playboy in its early years has always struck me as the ultimate men’s magazine. The emphasis on jazz and literature gave it a highbrow edge not found in today’s magazines, in which articles on socially relevant topics, rather than aesthetic matters, provide the weight and seriousness. Moreover, Playboy‘s editorial vision really did encapsulate a lifestyle,


No Picture

Lost City: John Lindsay’s New York

John Vliet Lindsay, mayor of New York from 1966 to 1973, personified the resolute confusion with which clubby, liberal WASPs faced the social upheaval of the era. Entering politics as a successful young lawyer, Lindsay represented the wealthy Upper East Side of Manhattan, known as the Silk Stocking District, in Congress from 1958 to 1965.


No Picture

Machine Man: Thomas J. Watson Jr. & IBM

In this, the second of two posts, Ivy-Style looks at clients of legendary clothier Chipp, as recounted by Paul Winston in our recent interview with him. For this one, on IBM president Thomas J. Watson, Jr., contributing writer Chris Hogan takes the reins. Although Fortune magazine proclaimed him the most successful capitalist in history, Thomas


No Picture

Out of Luck: The Rise and Fall of Peter Lawford

For this and the forthcoming post, Ivy-Style looks at two clients of legendary clothier Chipp, as recounted in our recent interview with Paul Winston. First up is Peter Lawford, who Winston credits with introducing the Kennedy clan to Chipp. Contributing writer Tom Ryan tells the story of the man who had it all and then


No Picture

George Hamilton: A Tan For All Seasons

If George Hamilton’s long career in TV and film has taught us anything, it’s that cultural relevance depends almost exclusively on one’s ability to reinvent oneself. Known today primarily for his permanent tan and penchant for self-parody, it’s easy to forget that Hamilton began his career looking very much the part of a clean-cut collegiate



No Picture

Man of Taste

In 1954, culture critic Russell Lynes published “The Tastemakers: The Shaping of American Popular Taste,” a lengthy meditation on the nature of taste, which Lynes believed had supplanted class as the new social hierarchy. Taste, Lynes argues, can be broken into three categories: Highbrow, Middlebrow and Lowbrow. Naturally the theory applies to clothing. A supplementary


No Picture

Ground Control To Major Thom

Zachary DeLuca, who answered our recent call for an editorial assistant, herein presents his first piece for Ivy Style. DeLuca recently completed an MA in English from the University of Edinburgh, and has lately been writing about film. He is a fan of midcentury menswear and lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts. To be at all familiar


No Picture

A For Effort

He was Old Hollywood, not Pennsylvania Main Line, from an immigrant Austrian family that settled in Nebraska, not the Northeastern Establishment. He favored gray flannels and suede oxfords more than khakis and tassel loafers, and he was in his fifties during Ivy’s collegiate heyday. Still, perhaps no other 20th-century icon better exemplifies casual American elegance


No Picture

The Autocrat of the Three-Martini Lunch

Bon vivantism, if that is indeed a legitimate phrase, is a characteristic — or, if you prefer, a malady — particularly evident in great historians and men of letters. From Ben Franklin and Emile Zola to Winston Churchill and Bernard DeVoto — whose book “The Hour” is perhaps the most elegant paean to cocktail time