‘Sucker Punch

We’re halfway to Labor Day, so if you’ve been neglecting your seersucker jacket, now’s the time to start wearing it all the time — even while riding the bike you stole from the new dork in school.

After all, doesn’t this model from Rugby’s website remind you of someone?

Click “continue” to see his pop-culture predecessor. — CC

20 Comments on "‘Sucker Punch"

  1. unclelooney | July 18, 2011 at 8:37 am |

    I was thinking Vince Van Patten in Rock and Roll High School.

  2. Great post. Sweep the leg!

  3. Damn you, Ian! You scooped my comment! Get that model into a headband and he’s a dead-ringer.

  4. The same actor was also the jock diver in Back to School.

  5. Billy Zabka! He wrote the book on playing an asshole. Funny enough, there’s an interview with him at the AV CLub that reveals him to be a pretty good humoured, self-depracting guy. But he’ll always be the hard-ass from Cobra Kai to me…

  6. Does anyone know where the model’s hat comes from? I can’t find it

  7. Gentleman Mac | July 18, 2011 at 12:53 pm |

    @David; Hartford and York carries a lot of hats in that style.

  8. You know what’s not preppy? Small woven hats (or bracelets on grown men).

    Does Rugby pay every preppy blogger on the internet? I can’t understand why everyone in this universe seems to hawk their junk so aggressively…..it’s straight up terrible. And obviously so. Was there really not a better, more classic, more appropriate, more wearable shot of a dude in seersucker available anywhere on the internet for you to use/make your point…?

  9. I was thinking the blond douche from “Party Down.”

  10. Christian | July 18, 2011 at 5:21 pm |

    AEV, I made precisely the point I intended to make.

  11. RoyRPlatt | July 18, 2011 at 5:43 pm |

    Rather reminds me of Peter Davison as “Doctor Who” (except that the person in the picture is wearing short pants, like a little boy, and isn’t wearing a stalk of celery pinned to his lapel).

  12. A. Willis | July 18, 2011 at 6:58 pm |

    Everyone always get down on Rugby….I agree that some of the clothes they come out with are terrible…but isn’t more the way alot the clothes are put together that makes them look awful? To someone on the very slight side, both in body and wallet, Rugby offers some good options

  13. Farmer Jones | July 19, 2011 at 12:05 pm |

    By all means wear your seersucker jacket, after all it is 92° today.

    You may, however, choose not to wear three layers of clothing underneath it and completely negate the purpose of a lightly woven summer fabric.

  14. As a natural blonde, I have noticed, and been displeased by, the trend in Hollywood to cast blondes as the bad guy. Sure, there are bad people in real-life, and sure, some of them are blonde, but the comparative rareness of blondes, along with their over-representation as bad guys in the movies (etc.), makes me think that maybe some people in Hollywood have an agenda.

    An agenda in the mass media? What kind of crazy talk is that? I must be imagining things.

    (cue vituperation from J. Ivy/Scooby Dubious/whatever silly name he chooses next)

  15. Hate to say it, but if someone dressed like that around here, they would get the c–p beat out of them.

  16. @Henry

    You’re an Ivy idiot.

  17. The key to rugby is wearing it the right way. No, not all of Rugby’s clothes are worth buying, but if you wear them right then they are great.

  18. col.whiffenpoof | July 20, 2011 at 7:58 pm |

    I was thinking the same thing because it was just yesterday I ran across this site:


    See #2

  19. Col.,

    Thank you for proving my point.

    The phenomenon jumped out me even more strongly than usual when I saw “Michael Clayton.” Terry Serpico, who has made a career as a blonde bad guy (see, for example, all his roles in Law & Order), played one of two blonde hitmen who worked together in “Michael Clayton”! It simply strains credulity, especially when the reality is that Americans of Scandinavian descent (who are more likely to be blonde than other ethnic groups) are better educated, have higher incomes, and commit less crime than Americans as a whole.

    Note to the inane: this is not a call to end the casting of blondes in bad-guy roles; it is to point out that blondes are over-represented in popular entertainment as bad guys, and that this propaganda does not comport with reality.

  20. About five years ago I had a story in development at the LA Times Magazine on the fate of the blond actor in Hollywood. In general, they are either villains (rich prick if naturally blond, psycho villain if dyed), objects of someone’s desire or obsession (Jude Law in “Ripley”), and, when they are the protagonist, usually die tragically young (Robert Redford, “Out of Africa”).

    I was inspired by Jung disciple Marie-Louise von Franz’s book “Puer Aeternus” (Eternal Youth).

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