Trade Show Roundup, Winter 2017

A couple weeks ago it was menswear market week here in NYC. The Millennial Fogey tagged along and enjoyed inspecting everything. Here he is in the Alan Paine booth: Yes, Bills Khakis is still alive and still using the same US factories, according to a spokesperson. Zip-up Norwegian sweater with Nantucket red trim from Castaway.


Brooks On Campus, 1940: Corduroy Jacket, Grey Flannels + Saddle Shoes

In the spirit of tolerance, I’m posting saddle shoes on the website, despite a strong personal allergy to them. But they’re part of a campus-inspired outfit formula from 1940, courtesy of this vintage Brooks Brothers ad recently posted to our Facebook group. The formula consists of corduroy jacket, grey flannel trousers and saddle shoes. You


Dirty Rotten Scoundrel

Back in 2009 in the early days of Ivy Style, I wrote this slightly tongue-in-cheek post about the movie “Dirty Dancing,” and how it showed Hollywood’s bias against clean-cut, Ivy-clad guys on the path to success. In other words, the kind of characters who used to be the good guys. Flash forward to 2017, and


My Kinda Clothes: Alligator Shirts And Real Bass Weejuns

“My kinda clothes” is a delightful little phrase coined by the legendary Charlie Davidson of The Andover Shop. It’s also a regular series here in which men discuss their favorite items of apparel. If you’d like to contribute, please use the contact button above. * * * I grew-up in Grosse Pointe, MI and my


Dateline 1967: Dustin Hoffman In The Graduate

Welcome to the first post kicking off Ivy Style’s yearlong celebration of the 50th anniversary of the year 1967, which brought about the fall of the heyday of the Ivy League Look. Pictured is Dustin Hoffman in what is presumably a publicity shot for “The Graduate.” Released in 1967 near Christmas and partially set at


Long Live The (Old) Esquire Man

This weekend the New York Times Magazine ran a feature story entitled “The Esquire Man Is Dead; Long Live The Esquire Man.” It centers around the magazine’s new editor and its search for relevance in 2017. There’s a lot of interesting history in the piece, though one thing’s for certain: the magazine won’t be going


Sunday Best: Super Bowl Crowd, 1967

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the year 1967, the year we’ve come to refer to around here as the end of the heyday of the Ivy League Look. We plan to make it a theme throughout 2017 as we gather photographs and anecdotes about this pivotal transition year in American social history. It’s


The Art of Ivy: Jacob Lawrence

Originally posted in 2011, this is Ivy Style’s first tribute to Black History Month. It also has the distinction of being written by Ivy Style’s youngest contributor, Robert I. Brown, who was a mere 16 years old at the time. It has been updated with new images. * * * Although Jacob Lawrence was a


It’s A Trad World

We haven’t had a story to classify under Ivy Trendwatch in quite a while, but here’s a positive sign that classic American style is still thriving at home and abroad. These great photos were posted to Ivy Style’s Facebook group by Anton Miranda, who does visual merchandising, PR and marketing for a men’s retailer in


Life Vests

  As a follow-up to yesterday’s post on vests, let’s take a look at a micro-fad that struck a group of Yale students in 1950. We’ve used some of these photos on Ivy Style before, but not the whole batch. The shots come from an April 1950 issue of LIFE Magazine, which reported on the


A Nifty Tip For Wearing Vests

Keeping the bottom button undone on a vest is the sort of information that fathers used to pass along to their sons, along with how to flush a public toilet with one’s foot rather than one’s hand. But as I am older than most readers of this website, allow me to offer a bit of



Remembering Dick Van Dyke And Mary Tyler Moore

Over the years I’ve thought about doing a post on Dick Van Dyke, as his television show was immensely popular during the heyday of the Ivy League Look. In many ways he is the pop culture personification of the Atomic Age man in gray suits, white shirts and black ties working in a field like


Z: New Scott & Zelda Fitzgerald Miniseries From Amazon

Every once in a while — say, a few times a year — a commercial comes on the television that actually informs you of something worth knowing. Last night I saw the trailer for “Z,” a new series by Amazon starring Christina Ricci as Zelda Fitzgerald. But there could be no story of Zelda without


Country Life Magazine On Colorful Cords

The UK magazine Country Life has an article on corduroy pants, which it calls the perfect country trouser. Although the piece waxes on the varied colors available, it appears that most Brits are only comfortable in subdued hues. The ability to wear go-to-hell pants may be a privilege of being American. Here’s a snippet: A


Southern Gentleman

Ken C. Pollock wears fine shoes today, but there was a time when he held his Bass Weejuns together with duct tape. Of course, that was for style, not because he was impecunious. Born in Birmingham, Alabama and raised primarily in Roanoke, Virginia, the son of an immigrant from Belarus and a small-town Alabama girl


Anglo-Southern Style

It’s menswear market week here in New York, and yesterday I met with several brands at a small trade show held at the Park Lane Hotel. Among the regular attendees are two friends and colleagues of Ivy Style, Crittenden and R. Hanauer (otherwise known as bowties.com). Both are from the South — Hanauer hails from


Declaration Of Independence

Unless you’re one of those blessed souls who can tune out the contemporary world and live for higher things like the contemplation of the universe and the late quartets of Beethoven, you probably noticed that our colorful new president has taken office amid a cacophony of cheers and jeers. It made for a lively weekend



Make America Dress Great Again

Here’s an idea on this historic glorious/infamous day when our country inaugurates its new president: how about creating a national fashion police to enforce standards of dress? There would be no more pajamas in the classroom or on the airplane, and hoodies would be banned from anyone over 18 or with a net worth over


The Polo Coat Gallery

Here’s a gallery of images of the so-called aristocrat of topcoats. Perhaps because it’s called a polo coat, Polo Ralph Lauren has used them frequently in its advertising imagery, including the image above as well as the following:    Here’s Ralph himself, looking casually bundled up rather than stiff and formal. This is the feeling


Added To Wish List: The Herringbone Polo Coat

For many years the 1981 BBC miniseries “Brideshead Revisited” has been my favorite film, if you can call a 10-hour book adaptation a film. It had been enough years since I’d last seen it, and so I decided to watch again between Christmas and the New Year. A great book or movie will constantly yield


Raising the Bar: An Appreciation of the Bar Stripe Necktie

Comment-leaver “Old School “offers this appreciation of the bar stripe necktie, also known as Brooks Brothers’ #3 stripe. * * * It all started in my freshman year in college in 1961. My French professor was an Englishman who came to school every day in a black suit, white broadcloth shirt, and a bar stripe