And the winner is…

Josh, for his insight into the rapid change of the 1950s, and how, in hindsight, we might have done things better:

I move city planning past the awkward, in-between phase of post-war growth: ticky-tacky houses and shopping mall commerce separated by vast, boring highways. I unveil new-urbanism before old-urbanism is dead, and design communities around walkable shopping districts, green space, and public transportation. New-urban dudes emulate my khakis and oxford style.

* * *

Ivy-Style presents its second reader giveaway and battle of wits. Bills Khakis has generously donated a pair of its new trim fit M3 model khakis. Made in the USA and inspired by World War II-era khakis, the pants retail for $98, a fine prize indeed.

It goes to the reader who can leave the most creative, amusing or clever response to the following:

It’s the 1950s. You served your country in World War II, got an education on the GI Bill, are still wearing your cherished army-issue khakis, and have decided to start a business. What kind of business do you start?

Examples:

a) You create a real estate company that makes residential developments with shared bathrooms to encourage interaction and combat suburban isolation.

b) You create a television that only works for a limited number of hours per week. If its owner uses up his weekly allowance by Wednesday night, he’s forced to go bowling or read books for the rest of the week.

c) You create a recording device that creates watered-down versions of black R&B music to make it palatable for white audiences, thus ensuring that when the song becomes a hit, the proceeds go to the original artist, not the later cover artist.

Use the leave-comment feature to submit your own ’50s-inspired entrepreneurial vision. And keeping with the fifties theme, let’s cap responses at 50 words. No dissertations or short stories, please.

Contest will close at 5 PM Eastern time on Tuesday.

A few rules:

1) Open to US residents only.

2) Your comment must include a valid email address. One entry per household.