Pop-Up Flea Highlights

Mon 22 Dec 2014 - Filed under: 1990-present,Clothes — Christian
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Last weekend was the Pop-Up Flea show, which has grown considerably. While mostly populated (yes, still) with a kind of hipster/workwear/urban lumberjack vibe, there were a few tradly items worth sharing.

First up is Bills Khakis, which was showing the tartan toggle coat above, as well as the quilted jacket below, which I believe is in waxed cotton:

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There were some fine shoes from Rancourt & Co., including these handsome bit loafers:

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These buckle loafers:

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And full-straps:

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Oak Street Bootmakers had these contrast-stitch loafers:

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Harvard alum Alexander Olch had a selection of wool belts:

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Multiple booths had striped watchbands:

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And finally, one of the salesmen from Individualized Apparel Group was sporting this lovely jacket for the closet that has everything. A lovely navy herringbone with a nice shoulder and swelled edges:

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… and then the surprises come, such as bellowed patch pockets:

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… and a belt in the back:

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Prices for made-to-measure from IAG were surprisingly affordable; I believe I was quoted something like starting at $600 for a sportcoat, and made right here in the US. — CC

Bush League

Thu 18 Dec 2014 - Filed under: Clothes — Christian
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After the extended JFK love-fest (hmm, unconscious pun there), it’s time to appease the other side.

On Tuesday Jeb Bush became the first republican to formally announce he is exploring a presidential run for 2016. Were he to win, he would be the third of a veritable Bush dynasty. His father may have been our preppiest prez, but beyond a certain taste for emblematic neckties, Bush looks just like any other politician.

His academic as well as life trajectories were certainly a bit different, however. Although he attended Phillips  Academy like his father and presidential brother (Jeb is pictured on the left around the time of his prep-school days), he did not go on to Yale as they did, but instead the University of Texas at Austin, where he majored in Latin American Studies, became fluent in Spanish and ultimately married a Mexican national.

America is certainly becoming more Hispanic, and evidently our Bush politicians are, too. If he runs, expect the campaign to be mano a mano. — CC

 

From The Corners Of The Empire

Fri 12 Dec 2014 - Filed under: Clothes — Christian
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In our last post we announced the annexing of a new Manhattan restaurant into the Ralph Lauren empire. Here are a few more happenings from other corners of the RL world. (Continue)

 

Let It Roll: O’Connell’s New O’CBD

Tue 9 Dec 2014 - Filed under: Clothes — Christian
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Last week O’Connell’s unveiled a new unlined and unfused oxford-cloth buttondown, dubbed the O’C OCBD, or just O’CBD for short. “I’ve been working on this baby for about a year,” owner Ethan Huber tells Ivy Style. “Wanted to emulate some of my personal 30-year-old Brooks Brothers shirts.”

Huber developed the shirt, including fit and cut, with Gitman Borthers, which manufactures about half of O’Connell’s shirts to the shop’s specifications. The new shirt is another speciality cut with O’Connell’s characteristic fullness in the body. Collar points have been extended t0 3 3/8 inches, and the buttons have been placed “to provide an ideal spread.” All linings and fusings have been removed from collar, cuffs and placket.

Huber tried about six different fabrics from makers such as Acorn and Threadtex.  “I was looking for a darker shade of blue,” says Huber, “with more contrast between weft and warp.  I was also looking for a cloth that wasn’t super thick, but was robust enough to separate itself from a pinpoint. When I found the right fabric, I put a bunch of them through the process of wearing, tossing on the floor, washing, laundering, ironing, not ironing, etc.”

While currently available only in blue and priced at $145, pink and white are up next Huber says. — CHRISTIAN CHENSVOLD

 

Fierce Authenticity: The Aran Sweater

Mon 1 Dec 2014 - Filed under: 1990-present,Clothes — Christian
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The cold will come upon us soon and stay. In preparation I pulled out my faithful Irish handknit. It might come as a surprise to some that the source for this sweater was Lands’ End. The company was stocking their catalogs with some credible country attire at the time, such as moleskin trousers, heavyweight Viyella shirts and Irish hand knits. I fell in love with the sweater the moment I saw it. I did not keep a copy of the catalog page, but the sales pitch was similar to the narrative on the card that came with a bit of yarn for repairs: “Somewhere far away, in a small cottage, a hand-knitter made this fine sweater just for you.”  The knitter was V. Thompson, her name on the card, which was a novel and nice touch. I imagine that she was part of a small stable of knitters drafted into making sweaters that ended up under a few fortunate Christmas trees over 25 years ago.

Some readers will be cheered and others chagrined to know that the Aran handknit sweater was among the handful of “Official Preppy Handbook” approved sweaters.  Whether preppy or uber-traditional, it seemed like a must-have at the time. I recall seeing them on folks and was happy to think that the wearer had a passing association with the Emerald Isle. (Continue)

 

In The Right Hood

Mon 10 Nov 2014 - Filed under: Clothes — Christian
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Last week some of you may have heard on the news that a guy in Philadelphia is selling signs to small businesses that say “No Hoodies.” It created something of a stir, as some people complained it was unfairly biased against contestants of Jeopardy’s college tournament and Mark Zuckerberg.

Hoods are much better when attached to a duffel coat, as in this illustration from the latest issue of the Japanese magazine Men’s Precious. Just be sure it’s down when you enter a shop, whether a convenience store, or the one pictured. — CC

 

The Art Of Wearing Clothes Elegantly

Sun 2 Nov 2014 - Filed under: Clothes — Christian
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We bring our series on elegance to a close with these thoughts from the founder.

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Take a look at this photo of former Esquire columnist George Frazier, author of “The Art Of Wearing Clothes.” There’s the Russell Plaid suit jacket, Churchill dot tie, and buttondown shirt — all pretty standard fare. But then there are the personal touches: the longish hair of the artiste, the boutonniere, and of course the cigarette with finger articulation straight out of Leyendecker’s sketchbook. If the sum total of the photo isn’t elegance, it’s at least sophistication, which is its first cousin.

Historic documents on the Ivy League Look reveal the breadth, quality and formality of the college student’s wardrobe in the aristocratic ’30s. But while neatness, correctness, quality and even panache within the boundaries of good taste were always virtues of the Ivy look, elegance is rarely mentioned. Indeed it was likely considered a vice in the deepest recesses of the preppy/Ivy tribe, smacking of outsiders and arrivistes. “Try For Elegance,” the 1959 novel based on author David Loovis’ experience at Brooks Brothers, sounds like a title his publisher chose.

In our lively comments section, some of the less broad-minded seem to insist that Ivy is a specific look. It’s easy to get that impression for the younger among us, those who’ve never seen first-hand the breadth of variety during the heyday at a legendary clothier such as Langrock. But I prefer to think of Ivy as a genre from which one can choose from a wider-than-you-think array of items to find one’s personal style. I can see the cool in the Ivy genre, and I can also see the elegance. But I suppose that’s because I can appreciate those qualities in other things as well, from the cool of Monk’s “In Walked Bud” to the elegance exhibited in the classicism and restraint of my favorite composer, Gabriel Fauré.

According to his biographer, George Frazier had practically an obsession with pink oxfords from Brooks Brothers. On a preppy kid with a green sweater draped over his shoulders, the shirt would create one kind of effect. On Frazier, with cigarette, martini and quick wit (not to mention, for a time, a home address at The Plaza Hotel), the effect would have been quite another. Elegance may not be an intrinsic quality of the Ivy League Look, but in the end what counts is always what you bring to your clothes, not what they give to you. — CHRISTIAN CHENSVOLD

 
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