Take 8 Ivy: Take It Or Leave It

Tue 31 Jan 2012 - Filed under: 1970s,Historic Images,Ivy Trendwatch — Christian
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The global Ivy Trendwatch continues as a Japanese publisher has re-released “Take 8 Ivy,” photographer Teruyoshi Hayashida’s follow-up to his 1965 tome “Take Ivy.”

Sequels are rarely as good as first offerings, and while “Take Ivy” captured the last rays of twilight of the heyday of the Ivy League Look, “Take 8 Ivy” is devoted to a 20-year span, most of it the 1970s. Needless to say, things had changed significantly. (Continue)

Happy Fourth From Princeton

Mon 4 Jul 2011 - Filed under: 1970s,Clothes — Christian
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TweedyDon, the vintage clothing collector/dealer from the Ask Andy Trad Forum, recently discovered this jacket by Corbin for The English Shop of Princeton. I thought it perfectly apropos for the Fourth of July, when it would hold its own against even the most extravagant fireworks display.

And although the jacket was made for a haberdashery called The English Shop, it’s pure Americana.

So on Independence Day, let’s drink a toast to England, which not only gave us our language, but many of the building blocks of the Ivy League Look. And then, without getting boorishly jingoistic, let’s pat ourselves on the back for kicking them out and doing things our way.

Happy Fourth of July. — CC

 

Le Crocodile: How Lacoste Became The Preppy Polo of Choice

Wed 8 Jun 2011 - Filed under: 1970s,Clothes,Sport — Christian
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By 1980 it was crystal clear: “The sport shirt of choice is Lacoste,” declared The Official Preppy Handbook. “Only the all-cotton model will do, the one with cap sleeves with the ribbed edging, narrow collar and two-button placket (never buttoned).”

How did a French shirt with a crocodile for a logo become the go-to preppy polo? Our story both begins and ends with the initials RL.

French tennis great René Lacoste was an innovator on and off the court. With a smart rearcourt-based game, he won 10 major titles and made 51 Davis Cup appearances as part of a quartet of French tennis legends revered to this day as The Four Musketeers. After retiring he developed the first metal tennis racquet and tinkered with golf club designs. His New York Times obituary noted that he kept working on racquet patents and painting landscapes until his death in Southwest France in 1996. (Continue)

 

Andy Warhol In Brooks — And Chrome

Sun 3 Apr 2011 - Filed under: 1970s,1990-present,Personae — Christian
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Last week a chrome statue of Andy Warhol was unveiled in New York’s Union Square. Sculptor Rob Pruitt opted to depict the artist circa 1977 in his Americana uniform of Brooks Brothers blazer and Levi’s 501 jeans.

Writes The New York Times:

Mr. Pruitt’s version of Warhol, which he devised on a computer, is young and beautiful with an uncharacteristically delicate nose and an unusually kempt fright wig. He resembles a taller version of Daniel Radcliffe’s Harry Potter, as well as the sleek preppy young men found in Warhol’s early drawings: the Andy that Andy, famously sensitive about his looks, would have liked to be. He wears the basic Warhol uniform of blazer, button-down shirt and rep tie with jeans and stylish oxfords. A Polaroid camera — impossibly bulky by today’s standards — hangs from his neck, and in his right hand he holds a Bloomingdale’s shopping bag, in which he usually carried copies of Interview, the celebrity magazine he founded in 1969.

 

Southern Frat: The 1979 “Are You a Preppie?” Poster

Fri 23 Apr 2010 - Filed under: 1970s,Historic Images — Christian
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Ivy-Style has just learned from a top-notch (and top drawer) source, who will be the subject of our next post, the identity of the creator of the late ’70s dorm-room poster “Are You a Preppie?”

Long before he went on to helm such films as “Patch Adams,” “Ace Ventura” and “Liar, Liar,” Tom Shadyac created the above poster as a fundraising effort for his fraternity while studying at the University of Virginia.

Subsequent research revealed this isn’t exactly news to the rest of the world, but the poster creator’s identity was news to me and probably a few others in Tradsville.

The poster is an important touchstone in preppy history as it falls between Nelson Aldrich’s Atlantic Monthly cover story and “The Official Preppy Handbook.”

The model for the poster was Shadyac’s fraternity brother Stephen Tunnell. To see what he looks like now, click here.

So much for preppies never changing. — CC

 
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