Gentrified Campus: The J. Press 4/3

Our confrere Matthew Jacobsen of OldMagazineArticles.com recently supplied us with a vintage article from the pages of Gentry Magazine (see “The Gentrified Campus.”) Now he follows up with another one, this time from Gentry’s Autumn 1952 issue, that provides an eye-opening glimpse into how collegiate attire was presented to young men at the time. As


Ten Thousand Men Of Harvard

OK, maybe not ten thousand (as in the school’s fight song), but here are a few. The handsome gent above and below is Aga Khan (no date for photo; Khan graduated in ’59), whose step-mother was Rita Hayworth: Students and professor, 1952:


Frat Pack

College fraternities of the past offered male bonding in a stylish setting. The photo above, plus the two below, are from Northwestern University in Evanston, IL, 1949. Click images to go to the hi-res version.


Customer Service

There was a time (1954, for example, as in these two photos) when you could visit J. Press in New Haven and have an old gent like this help you pick out a jacket. He may have been on commission, but he probably knew what looked good on you. You might even bump into Irving


Holly and the Ivy

Although the film version of “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” was made in 1961, author Truman Capote created heroine Holly Golightly in 1958, whereupon she took her place alongside Odette de Crecy, Suzie Wong and Fanny Hill in the long line of literary lady escorts. Holly’s 50th anniversary has been celebrated in various media outlets, including The


Holiday Jeer

As you break out the tartan jacket and red socks to hit the holiday party circuit, take a tip from Tony Randall and watch out for these fellow guests.


Prep Rally

Ah, the halcyon days at an all-male prep school, mid-century. Here we have two future lawyers shining their shoes while debating the merits of the various Ivies. The Hill School in Pottstown, PA, 1942 (click image to see clothes and pimples in hi-res):


Big Men On Campus

Michigan halfback Tom Harmon doing his sports radio show, in classic combo of button-down collar, knit tie and cardigan, 1940 (click images below for hi-res version):


Give Ivy

All of Tradsville is abuzz with “Take Ivy,” the Japanese photo book featuring candid shots of Princeton students in the late ’60s. Recently a copy of the rare tome sold on American eBay for $1,500. Then The Trad scored one on Japanese eBay for 1/10th that, promising to present scans of the entire book for


The Gentrified Campus

I recently called up an old colleague, Matthew Jacobsen of OldMagazineArticles.com, told him about Ivy Style, and said, “Whatcha got?” Matthew did not disappoint. What were Ivy Leaguers wearing in the fall of 1953? According to Gentry magazine, anything in tawny black. In a fashion spread entitled “Fashions Cum Laude for the Undergraduate,” the uber-elitist


Light in the Loafers

Here at Ivy Style HQ, I’ve lately taken to wearing socks lighter in shade than my trousers, such as a light-gray sock paired with charcoal pants and black tassel loafers. There’s something about light socks that puts a spring in your step. As you move, you catch the light color from the corner of your


Ears Wide Open

New contributing writer Scott Byrnes, who works in finance in San Francisco, was inspired by an Ivy Style jazz post and herein offers one of his own. I was in the middle of a long moving process when I read Ivy Style’s “All That Jazz” article, which inspired me to dig through boxes and pull


Grant Writing

“People Will Talk,” one of Cary Grant’s lesser known movies, boasts some interesting outfits for the sartorial historicist. In order to portray a medical professor at a small Midwestern college in 1951, Grant was costumed in one double-breasted suit, and three suits and jackets that feature a 3/2 roll, but still have the overall cut


Somewhere in Time: The Brick-Red Look

With this post Ivy-Style introduces a new series called “Somewhere in Time,” featuring historical articles from the pages of Time magazine that offer insight into how Ivy attire was worn — and viewed by society —  during its heyday in the ’50s and ’60s. We will also present a judicious selection of articles about the


Running Man

One of the good things about living in LA (I’ve forgotten the others) is the chance to see movies before anyone else does. To wit, several weeks ago, while on assignment for the Rugby blog, I took in a screening of “The Express,” a biopic about Ernie Davis, star running back for Syracuse University from

No Picture

Art of Noise

“Jazz is just insolent noise,” says Dickie Greenleaf’s father in “The Talented Mr. Ripley.” And no one’s noise is more sublimely insolent than skin-beater Art Blakey’s. For your visual and aural enjoyment, Ivy Style presents three clips of jazz-ivy style that may look buttoned-down, but certainly don’t sound that way. “I Remember Clifford,” by Art


All That Jazz

On assignment for the online magazine at RalphLauren.com, Ivy Style founder Christian Chensvold muses on that brief point in time when jazz musicians went for the clean-cut look, which, considering many of them were junkies, was the only clean thing about them. Sometime around 1954, jazz great Miles Davis walked into the Andover Shop, a


The Autocrat of the Three-Martini Lunch

Bon vivantism, if that is indeed a legitimate phrase, is a characteristic — or, if you prefer, a malady — particularly evident in great historians and men of letters. From Ben Franklin and Emile Zola to Winston Churchill and Bernard DeVoto — whose book “The Hour” is perhaps the most elegant paean to cocktail time