Search Results for david marx

David Marx Interview With Kamakura’s Yoshio Sadasue

Tokyo-based W. David Marx, author of the recent book “Ametora,” has just posted an English translation of an extensive 2013 interview with Yoshio Sadasue, founder of Kamakura Shirts, as part of his research for the book. Much of the interview centers around Sadasue’s years at VAN and the early days of Ivy in Japan. Sadasue


Friendly Rivals: GQ Interview With David Marx On Japanese Trad

When I was in college, I worked part-time tutoring foreign students in English. One Japanese guy became kind of a pal, and during a conversation one day he said, “The way it works is that America comes up with an idea and Japanese make it better.” I was only 20 at the time and this


Lapham’s Quarterly Excerpt Of David Marx’s Book On Japanese Ivy

The fall isssue of Lapham’s Quarterly features an excerpt from W. David Marx’s upcoming book “Ametora” on American style in Japan. Marx first wrote for Ivy Style in 2009 with the hugely popular article “The Miyuki-zoku: Japan’s First Ivy Rebels.” Pictured above is VAN JACKET founder Kensuke Ishizu, the man who brought Ivy to Japan.


W. David Marx On How Japan Saved American Trad

In September, 2010, I was watching my old cordovan oxfords get polished at Tokyo’s “shoeshine bar” Brift H, when a middle-aged man walked in and pulled out an original 1965 print of “Take Ivy.” The book had not only been autographed by all four authors, but also had a rare printing error. I leaned over


Superb Marxmanship

W. David Marx — who has contributed several pieces on Japanese Ivy for Ivy-Style.com — has hit the bullseye with his new book “Ametora” (that’s Japanese for “American Trad”). It’s a pioneering piece of research and a deftly handled narrative that traces the ups and downs, misunderstandings and mania for the Ivy League Look that


The Man Who Brought Ivy To Japan

Since the 1960s, Japan has been an important part of the story of the Ivy League Look, and during a few dark periods the island nation has played an important role in preventing the style from possible extinction. Anyone interested in the Ivy-Japan connection will eventually encounter the name Kensuke Ishizu — perhaps on the


Finding The Classics

As mentioned a week or so ago, the latest issue of Japanese magazine Popeye is entitled “Finding The Classics.” Apparently the best means of transportation for this search is via skateboard, as half the magazine features streetwear-clad boys on skateboards. Of course, maybe they’ll go from skaters to trads some day — it happened to me.



Japanese Ivy News Roundup

Following the Boston Magazine Vineyard Vines profile and Garden & Gun OPH interview, we’ve one more batch of media pieces to catch up on. They concern Japanese Ivy, and are excellent, lengthy pieces well worth your time. First off, Lapham’s Quarterly has a piece by “Ametora” author W. David Marx called “The Climb Of Ivy,” which


Limited-Time Offer! Introducing The Ivy Style Club Tie

Ivy-Style.com just celebrated its eighth birthday and reached 1,500 posts. That’s a lot of topics, contributors, and readers. We figured it was time to bring everyone and everything together symbolically with our very own Ivy Style Club Tie. The project grew out of Ivy Style’s Facebook group at the suggestion of a member. I came


Japanese Ivy Artists: Part Three, Yasuhiko Kobayashi

This is the W. David Marx’s last installment in his series on the original magazine illustrators who depicted the Ivy League Look when it first reached Japan. * * * Yasuhiko Kobayashi (b. 1935) is the missing link between Ivy League style in Japan and the post-hippie West Coast style that followed in the 1970s.


Japanese Ivy Artists: Part Two, Ayumi Ohashi

Ayumi Ōhashi (b. 1940) — née Kumiko Ōhashi — grew up in Mie Prefecture and moved to Tokyo to attend prestigious Tama Art University. A pupil of the cartoon illustrator Jun Kawahara, Ōhashi started to experiment with crayon pastels to draw young men in stylish clothing. After showing her work to Shōsuke Ishizu at VAN


Japanese Ivy Artists: Part One, Kazuo Hozumi

This is the first in a three-part series on Japan’s original Ivy artists. * * * When Ivy League fashion first appeared in Japan at the beginning of the 1960s, it was a wholly alien culture with no local roots. Apparel maker VAN Jacket and its media partner, fashion magazine Men’s Club, needed to win


Has Japan Run Out Of American Ideas?

Earlier this week, Derek at Put This On posted a lengthy Q&A with W. David Marx, Ivy Style contributor and author of the new book “Ametora” about Ivy, trad and Americana in Japan. It’s a smart conversation that Ivy omnivores will want to check out. Here’s a teaser: It feels like Americana, prep, and denim


Tradsville 2015, The Year In Review

Here are the highlights — good, bad and neutral — from 2015, the year that was. Help us add to the list. — CS & CC * * * Ivy Style gets a magazine-style, device-responsive redesign Ralph Lauren steps down as CEO According to The Daily Beast, college students lose their collective mind John Simons


Reel To Real: Take Ivy 1984

Deep Google searches on the phrase “Take Ivy” often return an image of a mysterious green VHS cassette with art from illustrator Kazuo Hozumi — evoking fantasties that the mythic 1965 film was once available as a commercial release. Six months ago, a former VAN Jacket employee handed me this very videotape after cleaning out


This Pen For Hire: The Murakami J. Press Stories

Tokyo-based Ivy Style contributor W. David Marx, whose book on the history of Ivy in Japan comes out later this year, recently wrote about the advertorial pieces famed novelist Haruki Murakami penned for J. Press: In the late 1970s and early 1980s, Onward spent massive sums on advertising J. Press in the print media. The


MFIT’s Ivy Style Exhibit Goes To Japan

Recently a portion of the MFIT’s “Ivy Style” exhibit was brought to Japan for display at Tokyo’s Isetan department store. Last week museum deputy director Patricia Mears posted a write-up on her trip to Japan to oversee the installation. Here are some highlights: Although the run was only a week long, the buzz surrounding the


Free & Easy’s Updated Ivy Issue

The latest issue of Japanese magazine Free & Easy is called “The Updated Ivy” issue and features scads of pages of every imaginable wacky twist on trad classics. In fact, one passage explicitly states that Tokyo Ivy is a lot “crazier” than New York Ivy.


Take Five: Ivy Style Celebrates Fifth Anniversary

Assistant editor Christopher Sharp takes the reins as we celebrate five years of news and commentary, words and pictures, clothes that make you cheer and clothes that make you cringe.  * * * As Ivy Style reaches its fifth anniversary, we are certainly now post-grads no plans on giving up the old alma mater. Christian


Take Ivy Photographer Teruyoshi Hayashida, 1930-2013

Japanese photographer Teruyoshi Hayashida (林田照慶), who created legendary photo book “Take Ivy” as well as follow-ups “The Ivy” and “Take 8 Ivy,” died on August 8 after a battle with cancer. He was just 15 days shy of his 83rd birthday. Hayashida was born in Tokyo in 1930, studying political economics at Meiji University. After


Chipp In Japan, 1978

In the late 1970s, Japanese companies went on a mad spree to secure licenses for American traditional brands. Everyone knows that Onward Kashiyama acquired J. Press, and maybe even that VAN Jacket made Japanese versions of Gant shirts. But what is lesser known is that Macbeth — a trad clothier founded in 1967 by former


Japanese Ivy Books Pinterest

W. David Marx, who recently gave us his interview with “Take Ivy” author Toshiyuki Kuroso, today shared on Ivy Style’s Facebook page his Pinterest devoted to Japanese Ivy books he’s discovered. It’s another fascinating glimpse into Japan’s longstanding reverence for American natural-shouldered clothing.


Talk Ivy: An Interview With Toshiyuki Kurosu

I am currently working on a book about the importation of Ivy League fashion into Japan in the 1960s, and as part of the research I sat down with Toshiyuki Kurosu (pictured above second from left) in February at the Kamakura Shirts office in Tokyo. Kurosu is legendary in Japan as one of the very


The Legendary Take Ivy Film

Just five years ago, 1965 photo book “Take Ivy” was a rarity. Most sat proudly on the book shelves of Ivy fans in Japan, with a few battered copies showing up time to time on Japanese auction sites for absurd prices. But now thanks to Men’s Club and powerHouse Books’ recent reprints, T. Hayashida’s photos